Wendelstein 7-X generates and contains 25 seconds of High Temperature plasma using only passive cooling

  • Perhaps you should be asking the bankers this question, They are the ones with the resources. They don't even invest in hot fusion, and never in fission reactors without all sorts of subsidies, both overt and covert. They are just not interested in 'blue-skies' research and development programmes.


    Well if they play by the rules of neocapitalism who can blame em?

  • Sir, you keep mentioning these 180 or so experiments (some of which were done over 10 years ago) without addressing the most important issue: where is the followup?

    There was no follow up because of opposition to the research, academic politics, and because the researchers who replicated were middle aged or elderly when they did this work, and they are now all retired or dead. You can confirm these statements by reading the literature, and then comparing it to the attacks in Nature, the Scientific American, the Washington Post, various books about cold fusion, Wikipedia and elsewhere.

    If these were so successful, why isn't this the main effort at all top universities and major research companies? Why weren't these efforts scaled up?

    This is because the decision makers at universities and companies do not know anything about cold fusion. You can confirm that by reading what they say. You should not doubt this, or be surprised by it, because you, Mary Yugo and many others here have made the same mistake these people made. You have read nothing, you know nothing, and all of your assertions about cold fusion are factually wrong, yet you are convinced the effect is not real.


    For example, people here claim that the "ratio" of input to output never exceeds a certain low level. Anyone who has read the literature -- or even viewed my 6-minute video -- will know that is not true. Not only is it false; it makes no sense scientifically, because input power (when present) is governed by electrochemistry, whereas cold fusion excess power is governed by McKubre's equation. Anyone can see they are independent. It is not a ratio in any sense. Skeptics offer only mistakes like this, with no factual evidence to support their claims. Some go beyond nonsense into the realm of crackpot blather, for example by stating that a hot object is "not a heater," and that an object weighing a few kilograms that remains palpably hot for a week with no input power is "not being heated."


    If scientists and decision makers would act rationally and scientifically, and look at the literature, especially the tritium studies by Fritz Will et al., they would know that cold fusion is a real nuclear effect that may well become a practical source of energy. They have not done this any more than you have. They have no right to any opinion, any more than you do. A person who knows nothing about a particular technical subject should never hold an opinion, or express an opinion. Knowing about other technical subjects does not count.

  • They [bankers] don't even invest in hot fusion, and never in fission reactors without all sorts of subsidies, both overt and covert.

    Given the situation with the AP1000 Vogle nuclear reactor now under construction in Georgia, the bankers are wise not to invest in conventional fission reactors. Vogle is the only nuclear reactor project in the U.S. in the last 30 years, and it is a technical and economic disaster. The PSC may decide to abandon it. The vote comes tomorrow.


    I personally hope they continue to build it, and I hope they manage to finish it by 2022, according to the new schedule. I would like to see that because there is no other way to reduce CO2 emissions in Georgia, to reduce the threat of global warming and air pollution from fossil fuels. There is not much potential wind power in Georgia. Plenty of potential solar power, but it is not being tapped.


    Two other AP1000 reactor projects were abandoned in South Carolina this July. I think there is no likelihood nuclear reactors will be constructed in U.S., Japan or Europe. Only China is making them. I would say the technology is dead.


    In my opinion, there is no likelihood Tokamak plasma fusion reactors will ever become a practical source of energy. They would produce far too much nuclear waste. By the time they are made practical, the cost of wind and solar power, and possibly space-based solar power, will be far cheaper than Tokomak electricity, or natural gas and coal, for that matter. Of course I hope that cold fusion can be made to work. It is potentially even cheaper than solar, wind or natural gas. See:


    http://lenr-canr.org/acrobat/RothwellJcoldfusionb.pdf

  • This reminds me communist propaganda https://www.digitaltrends.com/…reactor-halfway-complete/

    There also was a an update from General Fusion.

    http://generalfusion.com/2017/…-to-develop-fusion-power/


    While I admire engineering of GF I still don't see how they are planning to create a vortex in 1 cm volume of mercury they are planning to use as heat carrying and shockwave medium.

    I see that the GF changed the promise of fusion from 'years away' to '2 years' of so.

  • Given the situation with the AP1000 Vogle nuclear reactor now under construction in Georgia, the bankers are wise not to invest in conventional fission reactors. Vogle is the only nuclear reactor project in the U.S. in the last 30 years, and it is a technical and economic disaster. The PSC may decide to abandon it. The vote comes tomorrow.

    it appears the vote was approved to continue.

  • I'd be way more concerned about the compression and containment part than the plasma injector part. Creating a plasma is relatively simple. Confining it and maintaining it at high T is the hard part.

  • I am not sure how much mercury their big ball contains. Just imagine what happens to these few tons of metal after nuclear explosion. Now you need to create a vortex in it at least twice a second. Seems like insurmountable mechanical challenge.