Lab Video: Dr. Storms method for active palladium

  • “Making activated palladium with Dr. Edmund Storms”

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  • This reminds me of how Japanese swords are forged. It is an ancient technique. They hammer out the steel, fold it, heat it, hammer it out again, fold again, until they have multiple layers. Each layer is very thin. Do this 6 times and you have 64 layers. This distributes impurities (which is what Ed wants to do). It also makes the steel stronger and homogeneous (which Ed is not trying to do as far as I know).


    Ed does not fold it as many times as sword makers, but the method is similar.


    This is also how you make puff pastry.


    In this case, the goal is to distribute the finely divided calcium oxide particles throughout the sample.


    I love this kind of ancient, commonsense method!

  • The first time I played it the audio was very soft, I accidentally reloaded the page and the audio was fixed. Much thanks to Ed for letting us get this valuable hands on knowledge.


    It is kind of concerning to hear Ed’s strong breathing, I hope he is not having respiratory problems.

    I certainly Hope to see LENR helping humans to blossom, and I'm here to help it happen.

  • Thanks Curb. Reminded me of that old adage: "A picture is worth a thousand words". Far better also, than a thousand interviews IMO.


    I could not help but wonder while watching, that had Mizuno done a similar video of his mesh prep, or me356 his mysterious process, like Storms did in this video, how much easier it would have been for others to try and replicate?


    Hopefully we see more of these workshop type videos from Storms, and others. BTW, who did the filming?

  • yes, soon miam miam a puff pastry release :)


  • Palladium is getting cheaper..but is still worth an arm or a leg


    Can one roll zirconium, copper and nickel together with a few oxides?

    on a Vevor pastry machine?



    (57)AbstractNanocomposite metal materials and nanocomposite metal materials Manufacturing method. Embodiments of the invention relate to nanocomposite metals

    Materials and methods of manufacturing nanocomposite metal materials.

    Nanocomposite: The metal material consists of a carrier composed of Zr and two elements supported on thecarrier. Made of metal particles; Binary metal 14 is composed of Cu and Ni, containing oxidation degree of the body is greater than 31% and less than 100%. Include the above composite metal material is arranged in

    the reaction furnace of the thermal reaction device. After making theinside of the above-mentioned reaction furnace in a vacuum state, theinside of the above-mentioned reaction furnace is at least one of hydrogen gas and deuterium gas is supplied, and the above heating mechanism of the thermal reaction device heats the reaction furnace.Heated to a temperature range of 250°C~350°C, in this case, by filling the non-heating blank sample with zirconia beads onto the caloric correction test data obtained from the above reaction furnace were compared. The calculated excess heat of the above nanocomposite metal material is 100W/ kg and above.2 pages of claims, 20 pages of instructions, 13 pages of drawings CN114787401 B 2023.09.12 CN 11478740

    (14) (PDF) Title of Invention: Nano-composite metal material and manufacturing method of nano-composite metal material Patentee: TECHNOVA INC. Available from: https://www.researchgate.net/p…9uIjoicGFnZUNvbnRlbnQifX0 [accessed Nov 28 2023].

  • Regarding this wonderful video, Storms has conveyed to us the following message [edited to protect certain personal details]:


    Although the method I use to activate has worked on numerous occasions, some of the important variables are still unknown and uncontrolled... Whether I keep in touch with this subject will depend on how much interest is shown in my ideas. Jed now has all the literature I have assembled, thanks to the efforts of Tom Grimshaw. This information will be made available on LENR.org. and amplified by AI thanks to Jed. Perhaps now people might discover what is actually known.


    Our problem is not the level of acceptance. Our problem is the inability of people in this field to change their minds about how the process works as new information becomes available. In addition, the political system still fears this source of energy, so I do not expect its beliefs to change until the effect is so huge that it cannot be ignored. This will not happen as long as people keep ignoring the actual observed behaviors. We can never have proof so we have to work with clues that point in an effective direction. That style of science appears to no longer exist.


    Ed

    I certainly Hope to see LENR helping humans to blossom, and I'm here to help it happen.

  • t

    More workshop videos?

    I think that the present video poses a lot of research .questions.already

    What foil layer thickness? 1mm 2mm 0.1 mm???

    what about non Pd metals/ combinations Ni.Zr Sm Ag Cuetc

    what about the CaO size 2.5.10.20 microns?

    The <35 micron size was interesting... close to 400 mesh


    what other inert hard particles could work.?.

    Maybe zircon opacifier works like CaO

    At any rate the video caused me to closely reread the 2022 Macy interview in Infinite E mag/161

    Fascinating..

    http://www.infinite-energy.com/iemagazine/issue161/MacyStormsIE161.pdf

  • moved away from his prior method


    Pd activation seems to be a recent(as of 2 yrs ago) success

    there have been quite a few prior methods in 35 or so years


    Way to go at 92

    TM 2.16......

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  • Presumably the CaO particles will also react with hydrogen that is migrating through the Pa lattice, to create CaOH (calcium monohydrate). This will have a different structure to the CaO, as the double bond will be split - leaving one free radical electron. I'm guessing this would take up more volume than CaO, and create internal stresses, and possible local cracking, in the palladium.


    (n.b. this is not the same as calcium (II) hydrate, Ca(OH)2 - sometimes known as slaked lime).

    "The most misleading assumptions are the ones you don't even know you're making" - Douglas Adams

  • Does this mean that Ed Storms has moved away from his prior method, which involved pressing powders?

    I think so. He thinks the methods are related. Both methods create voids, which he thinks are the secret to cold fusion. The voids in this case are the spaces around the inert calcium oxide particles, as shown on p. 5, Fig. 2:


    https://lenr-canr.org/acrobat/StormsEthenatureoc.pdf


    He says other kinds of particles will work.

  • Presumably the CaO particles will also react with hydrogen that is migrating through the Pa lattice, to create CaOH (calcium monohydrate).

    I do not know about that. Ed emphasizes that CaO is inert. It does not react. He thinks you need particles that do nothing but make voids around their edges. That is my understanding, but you should read his papers carefully. I might be wrong about that.

  • Ed emphasizes that CaO is inert. It does not react.

    I took him to mean that it didn't react with the palladium.


    But, after all, CaO is quicklime - and does react, exothermically, with water (which is how we make cement). The resulting Ca(OH)2 hydrated molecule is quite a bit bigger than the anhydrate, so I was wondering if a similar but smaller reaction would occur with plain hydrogen.


    Maybe the chemists here can comment, as information on the monohydrate reaction seems well hidden, across the internet, by all the references to calcium (II) hydrate.

    "The most misleading assumptions are the ones you don't even know you're making" - Douglas Adams

  • But, after all, CaO is quicklime - and does react, exothermically, with water (which is how we make cement).

    How about hydrogen? These samples are used with hydrogen or deuterium gas loading, not electrolysis. I suppose some water will form on the outside. I guess there is some oxygen inside the metal. But not much.


    Ed knows a ton about chemistry so perhaps he will come here and explain.

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