Metal Hydride coated with Nickel

  • My intention is to produce fuel mixture from Palladium or Titanium Hydride and coat it with Nickel.

    Something in my head is telling me that this must produce something interesting.

    Why?


    Because upon heating Metallic Hydride will try to free up some Hydrogen. But since its surface will be tightly coated with Nickel extreme pressure will build up.

    If coating will be strong enough I would bet that it will produce some kind of a high energetic particle.


    Please let me know what is wrong with this? Is my assumption correct?


    I think that similar procedure is used by Russ George.

  • Because upon heating Metallic Hydride will try to free up some Hydrogen. But since its surface will be tightly coated with Nickel extreme pressure will build up.

    If coating will be strong enough I would bet that it will produce some kind of a high energetic particle.

    Please let me know what is wrong with this? Is my assumption correct?


    The amount (depth) and perfection (defect level) will determine what will happen. First, if you have a thick defect-free coating you likely will not load anything into the 'hydride' you coated with Ni. H does not form Ni-H until you reach gigapascals at high temps (400C at least). Ni is a good dissociation catalyst however, so you could form a monolayer of atomic H even at room temp and 1 atm. But it won't get to the hydride unless there are imperfections in the Ni layer. You potentially could get intergrain diffusion along the grain boundaries even with a good thick Ni layer, but I can't say if that will happen or not. Just assume thick Ni might well be a problem.


    A thin Ni layer can potentially be used to atomize molecular hydrogen and then diffusion of H to the hydride could well occur.


    BTW, this technique is routinely used by coating a difficult-to-hydride hydride material with Pd (instead of Ni).


    If you should hydride the hydridable material, and then heat it, you will desorb H2 but it will be in a very small volume which means the pressure will increase rapidly. Once the yield stress of the Ni film is reached, the Ni film will burst, just like a balloon. Typically yield stresses are on the order of 10-100,000 psi as I recall, but check that. Film integrity will also impact that.



    Something in my head is telling me that this must produce something interesting.


    Try taking some ibuprofen...

  • kirkshanahan: No, I don't wish to coat Palladium and Titanium with Nickel. I want to coat Palladium/Titanium Hydride. This is big difference. Coating unhydrided metal will cause many cracks upon loading. So this would be a bad idea.


    Bruce__H: I think that it was just not replicated. I repeated the experiment so many times and it was always success.

    I provided exact list of meterials that are working but it is uneasy to obtain them for normal people.

    So my next target will be to use materials that can be bought with no issue and I already tested Vaping Wire Ni-200 from EBay and it is working well too.

    I think that a Dry cell has much higher potential.

  • kirkshanahan: You misunderstood my intention. First you have to have Metal Hydride. Then you have to coat it safely. How? This is another task.

    But if you have such hydride that has a lot of hydrogen inside what pressure could be developed upon heating while blocking hydrogen right at the surface?

    I think that extreme pressure could be easily obtained at a nanoscale.

  • I provided exact list of meterials that are working but it is uneasy to obtain them for normal people.

    So my next target will be to use materials that can be bought with no issue and I already tested Vaping Wire Ni-200 from EBay and it is working well too.

    I think that this is a very good move!

  • Imagine you will enclose 10Kg of PdH2 in a stainless steel vessel with no free volume. Then you will heat it up. What do you think will happen?

    Very same thing could happen at a nanoscale level within cracks, pores and lattice itself. But strangely there is nobody that is thinking about it, at least publicly.

    Could anyone tell me why it would not work, please?

  • kirkshanahan: You misunderstood my intention. First you have to have Metal Hydride. Then you have to coat it safely. How? This is another task.

    But if you have such hydride that has a lot of hydrogen inside what pressure could be developed upon heating while blocking hydrogen right at the surface?


    I think that extreme pressure could be easily obtained at a nanoscale.

    Imagine you will enclose 10Kg of PdH2 in a stainless steel vessel with no free volume. Then you will heat it up. What do you think will happen?

    Very same thing could happen at a nanoscale level within cracks, pores and lattice itself. But strangely there is nobody that is thinking about it, at least publicly.

    Could anyone tell me why it would not work, please?



    Umm...I don't have to imagine. We do that here daily. What will happen if you raise the temperature enough is the container will rupture. A coated particle is just a very small vessel. Same concerns apply, but if 1 particle pops its not as big a deal as if your 10kg vessel pops. (but what if all your particles pop...) Once again, this deals in material yield stresses. If P exceeds the yield stress, you get a rupture.



    To calculate the pressure you can start with the ideal gas law. Assume all the hydride H forms H2 and calculate the moles. Then calculate the pressure vis PV=nRT. Realize though that once you get to roughly 400-500 psi, the ideal gas law starts to break down and you need to use another equation of state. We typically use the compressibility equation, which is PV= znRT, where z is the compressibilty factor. This equation works to several 10's of thousands of psi, but I don't know about 100,000 psi and greater. Check the literature.


    You might be able to electrolessly plate Ni on TiH2 but I'm not sure. I have never had TiH2 on the benchtop or in water, so please check if it is stable before trying that.


    kirkshanahan: No, I don't wish to coat Palladium and Titanium with Nickel. I want to coat Palladium/Titanium Hydride. This is big difference. Coating unhydrided metal will cause many cracks upon loading. So this would be a bad idea.


    Yes, you are correct. The molar volume changes upon hydriding. I think Pd for example increases about 20%. However, if you start with a hydrided hydride material and drive the H2 out, it will shrink. This may be a deleterious to your coating integrity as expansion was.

  • That is right. But the only thing you have to do is to heat the fuel just at a right temperature where pressure is still acceptable where no rupture will occur.

    But since Nickel is LENR active it could push the Hydrogen atoms at the right place.

    Pressure could be high enough to start the music. You would use just fraction of hydrogen that is inside at a single time. Heating it too much would break it, of course.

    Now one only have to calculate how strong the coating will be and what pressure could be theoretically developed without rupture.

    The higher pressure, the better for a (cold) fusion, right?

  • Actually Prof. Mizuno developed very similar procedure with implanting Nickel/Palladium in Hydrogen at a mesh. Result could be very likely very same since Hydrogen could be just trapped between surfaces. And he obtained COP near 2 with Deuterium. So instead of talking about a pills it could be more useful to reveal how this can be all done.

  • How about forming nanowells < 1nm diameter on the surface of the titanium sheet, expose to H2 or D2, then lightly coat with lithium metal. According to Wyttenbach's new theory this should evolve nuclear fusion reactions on passing a high current through this electrode in either an electrolytic or dry setup (like in a fuel cell maybe?). Be nice to find out if this works.

  • I think that similar procedure is used by Russ George.


    Loose assumption.. Russ has definitely talked about Silver on his Atomecology site.

    http://atom-ecology.russgeorge…turns-mainstream-science/

    Palladium.Titanium Lithium? Nickel.?

    Mizuno's procedure excludes O2 and is done at very low pressure.. and is extremely time consuming.

    Whatever Russ is doing is a whole lot more simple and less expensive than Mizuno's procedure was.


    Maybe you could try Titaniumhydride as per Sergei( he includes air) but ....PLUS 1% silver (PLUS LiAlH4?)

    Sergei's stuff

    Russia LENR Developments

    None of which I have in easy reach from my armchair..


    Wait up.. a few months .. I am confident we shall all hear the Russean nuclear euangelion ...coming into its kingdom

  • Hi JohnyFive


    In the photo you can see multilayer pellets coated with Nickel and with internal sheets of lithium and titanium hydrides.

    The original material was assembled by little plates formed by compacting the different components with pressure up to 42 MPa.

    I assembled these plates five years ago but unfortunately I have not had time to use this material.

    Great if you can test with Ni-Ti-Li Hydride.



  • Thank you for the interesting post.


    Idea of using pressure to put the mixture together seems to be great!

    Maybe it would be easier than a coating process.


    Just imagine what will happen when upon heating the Hydrogen will be pushed to escape from the Titanium. It will hit Nickel and develop tremendous pressure.

    If this will all withstand together than something crazy will happen.


    I guess that PdH2 or TiH2 together with C, Al, Cu, Li, Ni, W could yield something interesting.