USEFUL PAPERS THREAD

  • Steps to the Discovery of Electro-Nuclear Collapse: Collected Papers (1989-1999)
    Steps to the Discovery of Electro-Nuclear Collapse: Collected Papers (1989-1999)
    www.amazon.com


    The collected papers of Takaaki Mstsumoto. A steal at the price, collected/collated by Bob Greenyer.


    This book is an account of the journey of one life-long nuclear scientist as he discovered that the power of supernova to re-organise matter can be induced in simple experiments.

    "Far in the universe, nuclear collapses very often take place by the gravitational force after stars consume their fuel. Since the electromagnetic force is about 40 orders stronger than the gravitational force, it should be easy to induce similar nuclear collapses by the electromagnetic force in laboratory. But we never knew until now how to do that.

    Recently, the author discovered a nuclear collapse which was induced by the electromagnetic force in laboratory, during studying the mechanisms of so-called "Cold Fusion (CF)" phenomena. Several kinds of nuclear reaction which were directly induced by the electromagnetic force, called "Electro-Nuclear Reaction (ENR)," were found so far to occur in a special state of hydrogen clusters, called "itonic clusters," or "micro Ball Lightning (BL)." The nuclear collapse was one of the most remarkable reactions among ENRs, called "Electro-Nuclear Collapse (ENC)." Furthermore, very amazingly, completely broken materials by ENC were found to be regenerated again to thin tubes and films of conventional elements such as carbon, oxygen and iron. The latter process was called "Electro-Nuclear Regeneration (ENG)."

  • The most recent papers uploaded to LENR-CANR.org:


    Celani, F., et al. Further results using SIMPLE procedures to activate surface-modified Constant wires for AHE production. in 15th International Workshop on Anomalies in Hydrogen Loaded Metals and CleanHME (IWAHLM15). 2022. Assisi, Italy.


    http://lenr-canr.org/acrobat/CelaniFfurtherres.pdf



    Rothwell, J. More about why cold fusion will lower the cost of energy. in ICCF24 Solid-state Energy Summit. 2022. Mountain View, CA.


    http://lenr-canr.org/acrobat/RothwellJmoreaboutw.pdf



    Storms, E. The Nature of Cold Fusion (Cold Fusion Made Simple). in ICCF24 Solid-state Energy Summit. 2022. Mountain View, CA.


    https://www.lenr-canr.org/acrobat/StormsEthenatureoc.pdf



    Di Stefano, A. Experimental Observation on the Lattice Energy Converter, preprint and PowerPoint slides. in ICCF24 Solid-state Energy Summit. 2022. Mountain View, CA.


    http://lenr-canr.org/acrobat/DiStefanoAexperiment.pdf


  • New open source paper out by Mike Staker of Loyola University (Baltimore). Have not heard from him in a few years. He received a little help from Carl Page's Anthropocene:


    How to achieve the Fleischmann-Pons heat effect | Elsevier Enhanced Reader


    Abstract:


    To understand if cold fusion produces nuclear energy, a calorimeter was designed for

    electrolysis of Pd in heavy water with a precision of ± 0.5%: it exhibited excess power levels

    of between 20 and 240 W/cm3 accompanied by excess heat of 150 MJ/cm3 or 14 000 eV/atom

    of Pd, corroborating the original findings and verifying a nuclear source. An extra (other

    than commonly used Pt/H2O) control experiment using Pd/D2O lacked essential conditions

    necessary for producing the Fleischmann-Pons heat effect and so did not yield the

    Fleischmann-Pons heat effect, and neither did all Pt/H2O controls. Ten hard-to-achieve but

    vital conditions are disclosed for a recognizable (measurable) Fleischmann-Pons heat ef-

    fect; and these resulted in 100% reproducibility in this study. The phenomenon should not

    be rejected as a valid topic of research: it is not Rutherford's moonshine and rejection was

    categorically premature.


    Conclusions:


    The Fleischmann-Pons heat effect in electrolysis of Pd in heavy water at excess power levels of between 20 and 240 W/cm3 accompanied by measured excess heat of 150 MJ/cm3 or 14 000 eV/atom of Pd with precision of ± 0.5% is presented, verifying and collaborating the original findings and indicating the source of the energy is nuclear. An extra (other than commonly used Pt/H2O) control using Pd/D2O lacked essential conditions and did not yield Fleischmann-Pons heat effect, and neither did all Pt/H2O controls. Ten hard-to-achieve but vital conditions are disclosed for a recognizable (measurable) Fleischmann-Pons heat effect; and these resulted in 100% reproducibility within this study. The phenomenon should not be rejected as a valid topic of research: this was categorically premature.

  • This is very good. Thanks!!!

    I certainly Hope to see LENR helping humans to blossom, and I'm here to help it happen.

  • This is very good. Thanks!!!

    Hi,

    Can anyone out there explain to an intelligent layperson how what Prof. Staker refers to as crossing the miscibility gap increases the D/Pd ratio? The phase diagrams are Latin, I'm afraid; I am still in water, ice, steam world. For bonus points can anyone explain what the delta phase is, or is believed to be? And, since Prof. Staker's paper documents additional requirements for replication, is anyone here able to share any news of replication experiments following Prof. Staker's guidance?


    Thanks in advance, and apologies if this thread is not for questions.

  • refers to as crossing the miscibility gap increases the D/Pd ratio?

    the phase diagrams are not Greek but they are materials engineering speak..

    the" gap" I think refers to the crystal structure changes as you go from one phase to the other as H loading increases..

    obviously as you change equilibrium structures say from beta to gamma and from gamma to delta dislocations and stresses occur..even fracture Maybe this kind of hypothesis is applicable to other alloys,,, nickel..


    Staker does talk about the alpha/beta gap here

    "Previous LENR research bid to avoid loading hydrogen and its isotopes through the α to β miscibility gap. This
    scheme was initiated by the industry using Pd and Pd–Ag alloys for purification of hydrogen and isotope separation.
    The main concern was to avoid damage to Pd or Pd–Ag alloys, anxious about structural integrity (resistance to fracture).
    This damage is due to deformation and cracking accompanying large volume change

    associated with α to β-phase change.

    It progresses from sever plastic deformation (high dislocation density but unfractured)

    to eventually exhausting the limit of ductility culminating in cracks


    but I think he is talking about Beta/gamma and gamma/delta gaps as being important


    .
    M.R. Staker / Journal of Condensed Matter Nuclear Science 29 (2019) 129–168 143"

  • Thank you. I'll look at the earlier papers. When I look at the dotted lines beginning around .67 on the horizontal axis, I think of my plain-old-physics classes and graphs of temperature vs time, where temperature stops rising as a phase change takes place from ice to water. But that's not what's being graphed here, so what is supposed to be going on as the dotted line flattens over some regions of D/H to Pd ratio?

  • dotted line

    I think Staker is showing some kind of temperature uncertainty..

    it doesn't matter since its down in the 200K region.. I think his electrolysis was at RT..

    Broadly speaking, the phase change stresses/dislocations are contributory..( of the order of 1 eVmax?)

    but the Pd105 gamma metastable state at ~345 KeV seems more central in the 'fusion' 20Mev- zero range..

    but that thinking is beyond materials engineering currently


  • New paper by Francesco CELANI


    Electromagnetic Excitation of Coaxially-Coiled Constantan Wires by High-Power, High-Voltage, Microsecond Pulses


    https://www.researchgate.net/publication/365354792_Electromagnetic_Excitation_of_Coaxially-Coiled_Constantan_Wires_by_High-Power_High-Voltage_Microsecond_Pulses


    Abstract.

    This paper is mostly based on our presentation given at the 23rd International Conference on Condensed Matter Nuclear Science (ICCF23) held at Xiamen University (XMU)-PRC on June 9-11, 2021, but largely enriched to satisfy the requests of the referees. Upon the suggestion of the Conference Organizers, we added a detailed explanation of our procedures; moreover, we included the latest results and data from our recently published papers. In the framework of LENR-AHE (Low Energy Nuclear Reaction-Anomalous Heat Effects) studies, since 2021, we have been focused on innovative, low-cost materials instead of the usual, precious metal palladium. We found that the Cu-Ni alloy, known as Constantan (also used for J-type thermocouple construction), has the peculiarity of being able to easily dissociate H2 (or D2) from molecular to an atomic state. While the catalytic feature appears at a rather low temperature (150 °C), Constantan is also able to store atomic hydrogen within its lattice and/or at surfaces, up to temperature of 700-800 °C, and in a wide range of pressures. Thanks to our long experience (since 1994) with wires, we designed various experiments that take advantage of such specific shapes, namely in terms of electromigration of absorbed and adsorbed H, under a suitable longitudinal electric field ....


  • To jump to the report's conclusions: they used a much cheaper material than Palladium (Constantan, an alloy of copper and nickel), and they observe anomalous heat.


    (1) It was experimentally demonstrated that the “old” beneficial effects of HPPP [High Peak Power Pulse], discovered by us starting in 1994 with the very costly Pd system (Pd has recently cost about 75 Euros per gram), can be “transferred” also to the low cost Constantan alloy (about 20 Euros per kilogram).
    (2) The pulsing procedure, by itself, can induce some AHE [Anomalous Heat Effect], which is stable over time.