Frank Gordon / Harper Whitehouse - the LEC -collected papers

  • Drawing 5 mW without the Joule Thief and 1.2 mW with the Joule Thief. Very low power indeed, hope it doesn’t take too many LEC stacks to light it.

    I certainly Hope to see LENR helping humans to blossom, and I'm here to help it happen.

  • The big gamble is whether the LEC chemistry works for me. Not really been done before - acid-etched and pre-loaded (hydrogen) mild-steel plates co-depped with Ni sounds promising, but may not work at all. And nobody built a stack before.

  • Still waiting for some items to arrive, very frustrating. But I did some work on steel plate today, as well as making up the Watts-type plating solution. This steel plate has been cleaned /etched in citric acid and the abraded ready for a final clean with iso-propanol and then pre-hydrogenation.



    This is the material as supplied. Amazing how dirty clean-looking metal can look at 200X approx

    lenr-forum.com/attachment/24884/


    This is the material after ultrasound at 50C citric acid/DW at 20g/litre for 60 minutes



    And this is what you get after abrading (120 grit aloxite paper)

  • For an own experiment ( no LEC) a paper suggesed me the use of chloridric acid to remove oxides by US next degreasing by acetone. What is the best way acetone vs iso propanol ?

  • For an own experiment ( no LEC) a paper suggesed me the use of chloridric acid to remove oxides by US next degreasing by acetone. What is the best way acetone vs iso propanol

    If you mean HCl that will certainly remove rust, but I prefer to use greener chemicals like citric acid- which is also easy to buy at high purity. For degreasing, acetone works very well but often contains quite a high percentage of water, which is not always what you want hen degreasing low-carbon steel. Isopropanol is just as effective for degreasing and has less water.

  • Very busy in the lab right now, but here's a few snippets.


    First of all, who can resist this picture of total relaxation, the late summer warmth has melted this one's brain.



    But on more serious matters... Yesterday I ws working on preparing electrodes. First of all, drilling the holes that will hold everything together.



    Then, after ultrasound cleaning and abrasion and a final de-grease they get hydrogen imporegnated - on both sides. These are carbon rod anodes, and the electrolyte weak lithium hydroxide solution in distilled water


    ,


    Final step is Ni co-dep. My first attempt didn't go well, good adhesion of the nickel, but too fast and too thick. Answer to that is to dilute the electrolyte and drop the power input to allow plenty of time for H2 to be adsorbed into the lattice.

  • The cathode on the left was my first attempt at nickel plating, the nickel deposit on the LHS is way too heavy, so I diluted the 'Watts' plating solution 50/50 to reduce its conductivity and lowered the voltage and current as mentioned above. The result was the electrode on the RHS. The plating is smooth flat and even and well adhered, but still faster than I wanted for co-deposition though. This took 60 minutes the current and voltage are shown below- volts just above the Faraday limit for breakdown of H2O..



    .


    This is the plating tank (empty) The anode is nickel foam- simply because I have some and not a large enough piece of sold nickel sheet to give 360 coverage.



    And this is it with the Watt's plating solution.



    Because the plating went faster than I liked (for co-dep) I am doing post-hydrogenation overnight in yet another tank. The anodes are both sides of the plate, since these plates are for a stack. So getting a treble dose of hydrogen,- pre and post the co-dep plating. Once again carbon rod anodes are both sides of the cathode and the electrolyte is weak LiOH in DW.



    This is the current regime for both pre and post hydrogenation.



    All in all, a good day. And a good job I built myself a PSU with 3 independent channels.

  • Alan Smith this reminds me of a company I used to visit who carried out component reclamation using a "putting-on tool" (basically electroplating using a "sponge electrode" - with either the sponge or the surface moving).



    This could build up a surface with sub-micron accuracy. It wasn't cheap, but if it was otherwise a case of scrapping a thousand quid's worth of component, it was a bargain. It was a small family owned firm, and their workshop always reminded me of something out of a Frankenstein movie.


    Most of our jobs involved nickel plating onto high nickel alloy steels. Of course I was always concerned about absorbed hydrogen (which, interestingly, didn't seem to bother their other customers). Hence they kept a special oven in the workshop that was used for post-plating bake-out cycles on all our components.

    "The most misleading assumptions are the ones you don't even know you're making" - Douglas Adams


  • This the surface, post plating and post hydrogenation. Looks pretty brown and boring, but I think I need to go dig in the camera settings to correct that - visually under the microscope this is brilliant silver. More of these plates are on the way, but as a 4-step process is takes about 3 days to complete for eaxh one. But they follow through, so there's a new plate produced every day. If this works out I could investigate a bigger plating/hydrogenating system.


  • This the surface, post plating and post hydrogenation. Looks pretty brown and boring, but I think I need to go dig in the camera settings to correct that - visually under the microscope this is brilliant silver. More of these plates are on the way, but as a 4-step process is takes about 3 days to complete for eaxh one. But they follow through, so there's a new plate produced every day. If this works out I could investigate a bigger plating/hydrogenating system.


    With two plates completed you could already test if there is an effect ?

  • I am not sure that works. On steel anyway.

    Possibly not. The other reason for the oven was supposedly for stress relief. Both operations could have been pure voodoo for all I know.


    As it was, we rarely used it for more than a few microns of thickness - as the price was based on time, and if a thicker layer was required it became cheaper to scrap the component and start again. I usually only sanctioned the process for things like bringing accidentally undersize ground shaft diameters back to an acceptable shrink fit tolerance for bearings.


    If they needed to create a thicker layer for customers, they would build up the plating with some other element first (such as copper), and then plate nickel over the top.

    "The most misleading assumptions are the ones you don't even know you're making" - Douglas Adams

  • Have you guys worked out what is the optimal surface topology would be? Does anyone have access to ALD (Atomic Layer Deposition) as we might need a way to generate atomic layer films or perhaps create the right conditions in a breeder style reactor? As many have suggested which include Jozsef Garai now if you haven't seen his video, there should hypothetically be particular resonant wavelengths of hydrogen which can lend to energy exchange on an atomic scale? The question is what are the specific boundary layer conditions needed and how can we engineer them economically?

  • He targered to do as so many a kind of electron carpet between species to fuse them.

    He postulated a kind of "stable" deformated sheel at cavity surface, however surface electron layer will resonate continually between these 2 stages as he postulated below.


    Have you guys worked out what is the optimal surface topology would be? Does anyone have access to ALD (Atomic Layer Deposition) as we might need a way to generate atomic layer films or perhaps create the right conditions in a breeder style reactor? As many have suggested which include Jozsef Garai now if you haven't seen his video, there should hypothetically be particular resonant wavelengths of hydrogen which can lend to energy exchange on an atomic scale? The question is what are the specific boundary layer conditions needed and how can we engineer them economically?

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