LENR vs Solar/Wind, and emerging Green Technologies.

    • Official Post

    A small number of the most common domesticated animals will surely be preserved.

    They probably will. 'Rare Breed' meat, products, from steak to sausages already fetch a premium in European markets. Many of the old breeds are also tougher and require less inputs than modern ones.


    Meet Our Breeds | Heritage Breed Meat - Farmison

    • Official Post

    Dubai creates its own RAIN to tackle 122F heat
    The rain is formed using drone technology that gives clouds an electric shock to 'cajole them' into clumping together and producing precipitation.
    www.dailymail.co.uk


    Interesting. Hard to piece together, but from what I understand, the UAE is combining a new airborne "electric charge emission instruments" system, with the older cloud seeding techniques to make rain. Judging from the videos,and excitement of those overseeing the effort, it appears to be working.


    IMO, this could have broad geoengineering applications throughout the world, from hurricane control to drought hit regions.

    • Official Post

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/ne…ds-electrical-charge.html


    Interesting. Hard to piece together, but from what I understand, the UAE is combining a new airborne "electric charge emission instruments" system, with the older cloud seeding techniques to make rain. Judging from the videos,and excitement of those overseeing the effort, it appears to be working.


    IMO, this could have broad geoengineering applications throughout the world, from hurricane control to drought hit regions.

    It also has an “electric universe” underlying tone. The people of the Electric Universe have long hold the view that all the atmosphere and particularly the layers with more water content are a form of plasma and therefore the weather has an inherent electromagnetic component that has been completely ignored.

    I don’t know if you had ever felt that “smell” on the air that happens moments before a downpour begins, I have smelled it even here where I live which is one of the more arid regions of the planet, Yet, in one ocassion I smelled it and seconds later a downpour happened. That smell is the ionized air.

  • Battery breakthrough for electric cars.

    The problem of Lithium dendrites that cause reduced lifetime of Lithium based batteries seems tackled in a rather simple way. Also fast charging is hugely improved.

    There is some development still to be done to make this method applicable in commercial products but the discovery is very promising.


    The discovery is explained in a simple way by this youtube video (a channel worth subscribing).

  • So they are full in 1/20th hour.


    Current needed to charge them are total unrealistic.

    I do not understand your point.


    Obviously they will not be full in 1/20th of an hour, because that much current is not available at home. The limiting factor is current availability. With previous batteries, the limiting factor was the speed the battery could support.


    Superchargers on the highway and at dealer locations will charge a lot faster than home chargers, but even they might not be able to keep up with next generation battery recharge speed.

  • Quote

    I know people who charge Model S Teslas at home. The chargers do not take more amps than the house can supply.

    Yes and they charge Tesla S for nine - twenty hours. You should have hundreds of such chargers for to charge it in in 1/20th hour. And/or backup battery capable to keep whole charge + transformers at both sides of charger.

  • See you do understand mine point, the current on the grid is simply not available.

    Of course it is available. There are 1 MW power supplies at shopping malls and factories. Subway cars and small electrified railroad locomotives take 2.6 MW.


    1 MW power supplies are not that big. They cost $8,000. You could put several in highway rest stop, as long as it is near high voltage power lines where factories connect. You could put some on highways for 3-minute super-rapid charging. That is faster than filling with gasoline. Here are some photos of megawatt scale transformers:


    OIL-IMMERSED TRANSFORMERS, OIL-IMMERSED TRANSFORMERS direct from Shanghai Dingzhan (one-Stop) Electrical Equipment Co., Ltd. in CN
    OIL-IMMERSED TRANSFORMERS from Shanghai Dingzhan (one-Stop) Electrical Equipment Co., Ltd.. Search High Quality OIL-IMMERSED TRANSFORMERS Manufacturing and…
    dingzhan-electrical.en.alibaba.com


    Gas station pumps cost $16,000 to $21,000, so the transformer would be cheaper. It would cost less to maintain.


    Yes and they charge Tesla S for nine - twenty hours. You should have hundreds of such chargers for to charge it in in 1/20th hour.

    Obviously you would have industrial scale large ones. For home use, building codes in Atlanta now specify:


    "All dwellings regulated by this section shall provide sufficient electrical capacity for a 40-ampere 240-volt branch circuit for the future installation of Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment."


    About 8 hours.


    (I just had my electric power upgraded from 1950s equipment, so I know about this.)

  • The new lithium batteries that will be the "breakthrough" for electric cars can charge @20C.

    So they are full in 1/20th hour.


    Current needed to charge them are total unrealistic.

    Main thing about this new discovery for car applications is the extended lifetime given by the 10.000 charge cycles.

    Current lithium cells have a lifespan of approximately 1000 charge cycles.
    Quick charge will indeed be limited by capable infrastructure and the electrical interface limits to the car. As Jed points out, at the charger side it would be solvable, but charging sockets and cables will be the challenge. A compromise will likely occur.


    This new technology will also be applicable for other battery driven objects, e.g. mobile telephones where such quick charge will be feasible.

  • As I pointed out somewhere in this thread (I think), with an electric car you do not need fast charging in most cases. Most of the time, you recharge overnight at home. It makes no difference how long it takes, as long as it is finished by morning. You only need fast charging on a long highway trip. I doubt there will be a market for a 1 MW super-fast charger in a residential neighborhood. No one will use it. No one uses the regular 240 VAC chargers in our local park or grocery store parking lot. There are thousands of electric cars in Atlanta but public charging stations are hardly ever in use.


    It costs practically nothing to install a charger in your house. My daughter paid $100 in Washington, DC. I paid more, because I got a delux model. Actually, I paid lots more because I had wiring from the 1950s which would not support a charger, and because the electrician removed the panel and part of the wall and showed me the wires were scorched and likely to cause a fire. So I had all the wiring up to the breaker box redone. The 120 VAC wires from the box to most outlets are the same, but they now have computerized circuit breakers that instantly trigger if there is an imbalance or other sign of a short circuit. Sort of super GFCI that send all kinds of codes with blinking LEDs.


    Eaton 15 amp Combination AFCI Single Pole Circuit Breaker



    Note that megawatt scale super-fast chargers would not consume more electricity overall than than today 240 VAC home chargers. They would just consume it faster, in bursts, probably in the middle of the day, in locations along highways. That would be a burden on the electric power grid, but nothing it cannot handle. The power grid supports factories, airports, shopping malls, electric railroads, giant office building air conditioners and other multi-megawatt applications.



    As noted by Rob Woudenberg the charging socket in the front of the car would be the limiting factor. The Tesla supercharger ones support very high power, but they would never work recharging in 3 minutes. It would make no sense to put in a super-high power socket when most cars are recharged overnight at home.

  • As Jed points out, most people with electric cars charge at home where it doesn’t much matter how long charging takes. High-speed chargers are for road trips. Many Tesla superchargers can give you 200 miles in 20 minutes. That is good enough for most people under most circumstances. Fixating on edge cases to argue against the utility of electric cars is silly. If, say, 95 out a 100 people can do just fine with an EV with today’s technology, the other five people are not going to stop the transformation of vehicle transportation.

  • 1 MW power supplies are not that big. They cost $8,000. You could put several in highway rest stop, as long as it is near high voltage power lines where factories connect. You could put some on highways for 3-minute super-rapid charging. That is faster than filling with gasoline.


    The cost of the transformers is negligible. Tapping into the grid for the odd MW costs a lot in the UK (and I suspect elsewhere) - and as I am offering an off-grid source of hydrogen (The H2 Pod) I have researched this very thoroughly. The indicative charge (as stated by the grid operators) for 1 MW grid access point in the UK is $150,000+. There is also an annual insurance and connection charge of 7% of the the connection charge. If you need some serious cable-laying to access the nearest suitable grid connection it will cost you $300,000 per mile. At least. Sometimes connecting an electrolyser or a fast-charging cluster to the grid can amount to as much as 50% of the cost of the hardware it runs.

  • An important point highlighted by an Renault expert is the problem of power supply of loading stations.

    Often these stations have to stay close to main roads, however, this does not mean that local electrical network is available, especially well dimensioned at these places.

    He talked to me to the high relevance of Lenr spots in this way.

  • Helion
    Enabling a future with unlimited clean energy
    www.helionenergy.com


    COMMERCIAL HOT FUSION OR A PAIN IN THE BANK?


    US-based Helion Energy announced that its sixth fusion generator prototype has exceeded 100 million degrees Celsius. The prototype, called Trenta, has undergone a 16-month series of reliability and durability tests on key components of the fusion process.

    This is the temperature a commercial reactor would operate at, the company said. Meanwhile, the durability tests confirm the reliability of the system. These achievements give the company confidence to proceed with development of its unique pulsed-fusion, ignition-free device.

    A Helion Energy representative told EE Times that the key to Helion’s approach is engineering efficiency. “We directly convert fusion energy into electricity, which means that we don’t require “ignition” and can produce net electricity at much lower net energy [Q] values. Our challenges now are primarily engineering challenges rather than science challenges.”

    Helion Energy uses a pulsed fusion system, keeping the fusion device small and allowing for flexible electricity production. It is using deuterium and helium-3 (D-³He) as fuel.

    Fusion Energy

    Investment in fusion energy research and development has increased. Researchers are achieving encouraging results. There is a growing expectation that fusion might become a viable option for the production of abundant, clean, and reliable electricity.

    One of the key obstacles for many fusion power proposals is that using them will require upgrades to the existing power grid. Helion claims it is side-stepping this issue.

    “Helion’s fusion electricity generators are compact, use small amounts of fuel, and can run 24/7. Therefore, one of the key benefits of Helion’s power facilities is that they can directly plug into existing transmission infrastructure and replace current fossil-fuel-based power generation without significant investment in additional infrastructure. Grid-level transmission infrastructure is a requirement of large-scale, gigawatt-class power associated with traditional fusion approaches,” said the Helion rep.

    Fusion aims to provide an abundant and reliable basic energy solution to meet the world’s growing energy needs. Climate change is one of the world’s most challenging and pressing challenges, and new energy technologies are needed to answer the climate crisis. From Helion’s perspective, the climate crisis needs a breakthrough and renewables can no longer be the primary source of energy production. As energy needs become more widespread, fusion can provide an abundant and reliable basic energy solution.

    “Fusion is an abundant source of zero-carbon baseload power, but unlike fission, fusion cannot produce a runaway chain reaction. If something goes wrong, fusion simply stops. Fusion also does not produce any long-term waste and cannot be weaponized,” said the Helion rep.

    Helion energy’s prototype

    Helion Energy’s Trenta prototype merged and compressed high-Beta field reversed configuration (FRC) deuterium plasmas under fusion conditions, achieving 9 keV total plasma temperature (over 100 million degrees Celsius) in bulk with operation above 8 keV ion temperature and 1 keV electron temperature. In 2018 its 5th generation prototype produced magnetic fields of 7 T and reached ion temperature of 2 keV at high density.

    The system is composed of magnets that accelerate two FRCs to 1 million mph from opposite ends of the 40-foot accelerator. Then they collide in the center. When the FRCs collide in the center of the system, they are compressed by a magnetic field until they reach fusion temperatures. At this temperature, the deuterium and helium-3 ions move quickly, overcoming the forces that repel one another, allowing the ions to combine, or fuse. This releases energy, and the plasma expands, pushing back on the magnetic field. The change in field induces current and thus electricity to power electrical loads