Simon Brink "Subtle Atomics" Discussion Thread

  • The trouble is nobody really knows whether the QX really is a plasma-based system-its all at atmospheric pressure (or higher) and the temperatures are probably less than those claimed. Its all dubious data. I do however believe Alan and Russ's new reactor-based work in producing gammas and excess heat, this is valuable new data and their collaboration with Wyttenbach's theories seems to be the best approach to date. They also did test out a gas discharge tube system but are not at present thinking of extending their experiments to look at low temperature dusty plasmas in PULVA1 type reactors or in modified SAFIRE systems. The inertial electrostatic confinement group no longer have any working reactors, instead they're spending all their time modelling reactors with computer simulations. So although dusty plasma research is an intensive field of mainstream physics, nobody is using this technology to study LENR. This approach may ultimately produce the first generation of fusion reactors to produce reliable energy-its definitely worth investigating. Maybe we could set up something with S. Brink/R.Mills or even L. Holmlid or to have a look at this.

  • Fusion research is an international field - there should be no geographical restrictions on LENR research - but if no collaborative effort can be established then its down to whether I can put together a small team here in the UK to study it further.


  • No, not too difficult to replicate, but all it would show is that electrolysis changes the infrared emissivity of the stainless steel plates. That would result from the color and texture change change commonly seen in electrolytic treatment of metals.


    I agree and might add that under these conditions the cathode stainless steel plate probably became hydrogen embrittled, which has been shown to change the morphology of the steel ( see https://www.sciencedirect.com/…abs/pii/S0921509399003196 ) and thus probably its infrared emissivity. Yet the positive anode was probably resistant to oxidation. (Oxidation of metals can increase emissivity on the order of 20 fold. )

  • I agree and might add that under these conditions the cathode stainless steel plate probably became hydrogen embrittled, which has been shown to change the morphology of the steel ( see https://www.sciencedirect.com/…abs/pii/S0921509399003196 ) and thus probably its infrared emissivity. Yet the positive anode was probably resistant to oxidation. (Oxidation of metals can increase emissivity on the order of 20 fold. )


    This shows an issue I was mentioning earlier: if one is not willing to question and (re)investigate existing phenomena because conventional and established explanations already exist for them, how are new fundamental discoveries going to be made?


    As I wrote in another thread (and will expand somewhat here), since LENR are thought to exist in environments ranging from electrolytic experiments to dry powders to dusty plasma environment, using materials ranging from common metal oxides to precious pure metals, it's highly probable that they're a much more common phenomenon than generally thought.


    But if this is the case, then it means that many previously observed effects and phenomena should need reinterpretation in light of the new evidence and views.

  • As I wrote in another thread (and will expand somewhat here), since LENR are thought to exist in environments ranging from electrolytic experiments to dry powders to dusty plasma environment, using materials ranging from common metal oxides to precious pure metals, it's highly probable that they're a much more common phenomenon than generally thought.


    Cold fusion is a natural phenomenon, and as such it will occur anywhere the right circumstances prevail. That is what I like so much about Russ's 'Atom-Ecology' philosophy, which holds that since it is a natural phenomenon it will involve relatively (by the standards of modern physical chemistry) complex fuels and particular methods of preparing them. Nature never initiates anything in a pure single or dual element system like Pd/D or Ni/H, it takes a whole lot of stuff going on, chemically, thermodynamically - and so on, right down the list.

  • Alan Smith

    When the prevailing consensus within the niche of researchers who regards it as real is that cold fusion is a rare phenomenon which occurs within the lattice of deuterium-saturated metals like palladium, it's hard to imagine that it could be a natural (as in: spontaneously occurring in nature, as opposed to incandescent light bulbs or transistors to name a couple examples) or even common phenomenon.

  • prevailing consensus within the niche of researchers who regards it as real is that cold fusion is a rare phenomenon


    Can,I am not sure that there is a consensus.

    Fleischmann's start with deuterium saturated palladium has diversified quite a bit...


    Ecological expts with many variables (as in ecosytems) are much harder to do (Russ found that out with salmon)

    The current Technova alloys use a mix of metals +oxides+ H or D.

    Many more tests have to be done when the mixs get complicated( at the Technova lab many runs are being done.. even today?.)


    In Russia there has been a underlying philosophy of LENR being a natural phenomenon ..

    For example LENR may have formed the Earth's crust

    Kuznetsov, V.D. & Mishinsky, Gennady & Pen'kov, F.M. & Arbuzov, V.I. & Zhemenik, Victor. (2003). Low energy transmutation of atomic nuclei of chemical elements. 28. 173-213.


    We also don't know the depth of Nature so well.

    For example, not so many know that we have billions of electric motors running in our own mitochondria.



  • If anyone is in communication with Simon Brink, please ask him to participate in this thread.


    I have a load of questions I'd like to ask.


    1) Is platinum a catalyst according to his theory and where should it be on his chart?


    2) What does he think is the lifetime of the different states of shrunken hydrogen before they go back to the ground state?


    3) What does he think is required to make a "small hydrogen" atom undergo a nuclear reaction with another atom? For example, is there a special type of stimulation required that is different than what is required to produce the "small hydrogen" atom?


    4) Does he agree with Mills that an arc discharge accelerates the reaction rate due to the elimination of the space charge problem?


    5) Does he think shrunken electrons could be repeatedly pumped to extract energy from the aether?


    6) During any of his experiments, has he observed "strange radiation" track marks?


    7) What is his plans to take his research to the next level?