Does LENR scale well?

  • Those huge tens of ton stone balls that Gennadiy Tarassenko has been highlighting in his thread (Generator Tarasenko based on the model of the planet Earth)

    are most likely produced by an upscaled LENR reaction. Those same types of spheres but on a microscopic size scale have been seen in a number of LENR reactor ash samples. The LENR reaction that can produce such huge things is hard to comprehend. But experiments always reveal truth, beleive it or not.


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    Why this meaningless talk about scaling.


    Because it has not happened. And if LENR experiments "scale," one could be designed large enough to produce enough power and energy to impress even very resistant skeptics who hold the key to funding sources. And as others pointed out, an LENR reactor with enough excess power would self run a very long time, which would convince essentially everyone.

  • JedRothwell

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    No, it isn't. I toured NIST yesterday, and they seem to be shrinking down all of their devices, from room sized atomic clocks to ones that fit in your pocket.


    Not a very useful analogy. NIST is not in the business of making or investigating new sources of energy. Their product is accuracy in making measurements and maintaining standards for measurement. And if you examine the course of that parameter against time, you will see that their product has improved continuously and still does. LENR has not. In fact, seemingly the contrary.

    • Because it has not happened. And if LENR experiments "scale," one could be designed large enough to produce enough power and energy to impress even very resistant skeptics who hold the key to funding sources. And as others pointed out, an LENR reactor with enough excess power would self run a very long time, which would convince essentially everyone.





    you'r right about that Seven. The downfall may be the frequenies we use for communications and a few other things may be disturbed.

  • Traditional nuclear fuel has a huge energy density, but a limited power density - roughly 10% that of rocket fuel (iirc). The problem is, the ceramic fuel is an insulator, so traps it's evolved heat inside itself. At higher power densities the fuel would melt - which is less than ideal.


    It's not to surprising that a metal electrode could handle higher power densities, it's simply a better conductor of heat.

    This is why you have a liquid fuel that is its own coolant. The energy density will rise significantly with a liquid or dusty plasma fuel medium.


    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fission_fragment_reactor

    https://www.aps.org/units/fps/…ters/201101/hargraves.cfm


    Apply similar physics to LENR. is a molten fuel LENR reactor similar to a LFTR possible?