MacGyver (aka JohnyFive) LENR experiment


  • I really think that in the proper conditions, hydrogen will work every bit as effectively as deuterium.

  • According to Holmlid it is not possible. Well, DD fusion is relatively easy, isnt it? DD fusion catalyzed by muon is even easier. pp fusion is not easy at all.


    UPDATE: Getting great results - steady 5-6 times of background level and 0.15W input power. Just folded paper again. Water is completely black from 4th day. Runtime - 1 week.

    It is very heart-warming to hear so many clicks, haha.

  • Oh, I've thought MacGyver is well known around the world. My fault.

    It is exactly what I think about the experiment. You can do a freaky stuff with an electrical tape, some strange water and a junk from garage.

    It is very ironic how one can achieve what is thought to be impossible with little bit of luck and with very conventional things.


    Actually I think the problem is not in replication but measurement. I think that many LENR experiments were successful but due to lack of a proper measurement it was concluded to be fail.


    If you feel it would help let's change the thread label.

  • Ooops, I forgot to mention my Pancake detector changed internal appearance. Half of the detector changed color (under mica window) - especially electrode. I don't know how that could happen. Fortunately measurement performance seems to be not compromised.

    I will try to take a photo.

    • Official Post

    Apparently this result using Ti is well known with many publications. Ed Storms came up with these.


    1. B. V. Derjaguin, A. G. Lipson, V. A. Kluev, D. M. Sakov, Y. P. Toporov, Titanium fracture yields neutrons? Nature (London) 341, 492 (issue 6242, 6212. Oct, Scientific Corresp. (1989).

    2. A. G. Lipson, V. A. Klyuev, B. V. Deryagin, Y. P. Toporov, D. M. Sakov, Anomalous beta activity of products of mechanical working of a titanium- deuterated material. Sov. Tech. Phys. Lett. 15, 783 (1989).

    3. A. G. Lipson, V. A. Klyuev, Y. P. Toporov, B. V. Deryagin, D. M. Sakov, Deuterium-deuterium fusion initiation by friction in the system titanium- deuterated polymer. Pis'ma Zh. Tekh. Fiz. 15, 26 (in Russian) (1989).

    4. A. G. Lipson, A. G. Sakov, V. A. Klyuev, B. V. Deryagin, Y. P. Toporov, Neutron emission during the mechanical treatment of titanium in the presence of deuterated substances. JETP 49, 675 (1989).

    5. P. Perfetti, F. Cilloco, R. Felici, M. Capozi, A. Ippoliti, Neutron emission under particular nonequilibrium conditions from palladium and titanium electrolytically charged with deuterium. Nuovo Cimento Soc. Ital. Fis. D 11, 921 (1989).

    6. J. P. Briand, G. Ban, M. Froment, M. Keddam, F. Abel, Cold fusion rates in titanium foils. Phys. Lett. A145, 187 (1990).

    7. J. T. Dickinson, L. C. Jensen, S. C. Langford, R. R. Ryan, E. Garcia, Fracto-emission from deuterated titanium: Supporting evidence for a fracto-fusion mechanism. J. Mater. Res. 5, 109 (1990).

    8. T. Izumida, Y. Ozawa, K. Ozawa, S. Izumi, S. Uchida, T. Miyamoto, H. Yamashita, H. Miyadera, A search for neutron emission from cold nuclear fusion in a titanium-deuterium system. Fusion Technol. 18, 641 (1990).

    9. A. G. Lipson, V. A. Klyuev, Y. P. Toporov, B. V. Deryagin, Neutron generation by mechanical activation of metal surfaces. Pis'ma Zh. Tekh. Fiz. 16, 54 (in Russian) (1990).

    10. V. F. Zelenskii, V. F. Rybalko, A. N. Morozov, G. D. Tolstolutskaya, V. G. Kulish, S. V. Pistryak, I. S. Martynov, Experiments on cold nuclear fusion in Pd and Ti saturated with deuterium by ion implantation. Vopr. At. Nauki Tekh. Ser.: Fiz. Radiats. Povr. Radiats. Materialoved. 52, 65 (in Russian) (1990).

    11. I. L. Beltyukov, N. B. Bondarenko, A. A. Janelidze, M. Y. Gapanov, K. G. Gribanov, S. V. Kondratov, A. G. Maltsev, P. I. Novikov, S. A. Tsvetkov, V. I. Zakharov, Laser-induced cold nuclear fusion in Ti-H2-D2-T2 compositions. Fusion Technol. 20, 234-238 (1991).

    12. V. F. Zelenskii, V. F. Rybalko, Studies of neutron emission by mechanical destruction of Ti and Pd samples, saturated with deuterium. Vopr. At. Nauki Tekh. Ser.: Fiz. Radiats. Povr. Radiats. Materialoved. 2, 46 (In Russian) (1991).

    13. K. Watanabe, Y. Fukai, N. Niimura, O. Konno, A search for fracture-induced nuclear fusion in some deuterium-loaded materials, in Third International Conference on Cold Fusion, "Frontiers of Cold Fusion", Ed: H. Ikegami, (Universal Academy Press, Inc., Tokyo, Japan, Nagoya Japan, 1992), 473.

    14. A. G. Lipson, B. F. Lyakhov, E. I. Saunin, B. V. Deryagin, Y. P. Toporov, V. A. Klyuev, D. M. Sakov, The generation of nuclear fusion products by a combination of cavitation action and electrolysis at the titanioum surface in deuterated electrolyte. Zh. Tekh. Fiz. 63, 187 (in Russian) (1993).

    15. T. Shirakawa, M. Chiba, M. Fujii, K. Sueki, S. Miyamoto, Y. Nakamitu, H. Toriumi, T. Uehara, H. Miura, T. Watanabe, K. Fukushima, T. Hirose, T. Seimiya, H. Nakahara, A neutron emission from lithium niobate fracture. Chem. Lett., 897 (1993).

    16. J. Uchrin, R. Uchrin, K. Gerasimsov, O. Lomovski, 1995

    17. M. Algueró, J. F. Fernández, F. Cuevas, C. Sánchez, An interpretation of some postelectrolysis nuclear effects in deuterated titanium. Fusion Technol. 29, 390 (1996).

    18. A. Bertin, M. Bruschi, V. M. Bystritsky, M. Capponi, S. De Castro, B. Cereda, V. D. Dugar-Zhabon, A. Ferreti, D. Galli, B. Giacobbe, V. I. Kirpal, A. I. Knyazev, I. M. Kravchenko, U. Marconi, I. Massa, S. I. Merzlyakov, C. Moroni, M. Piccinini, M. Poly, L. A. Rivkis, N. V. Samsonenko, N. Semprini-Cesari, V. N. Shvetsov, V. T. Sidorov, V. N. Smirnov, S. I. Sorokin, R. Spighi, E. P. Starshin, V. A. Stolupin, A. V. Strelkov, S. Vecchi, A. Vezzani, M. Villa, A. Vitale, J. Wozniak, G. Zavattini, N. I. Zhuravlev, A. Zoccoli, Negative result of an experiment aimed at verifying the hypothesis that cold and hot nuclear fusion occurs in Ti/(D-T) and ZrNbV/(D-T) systems. Phys. At. Nucl. 59, 744 (1996).

    19. T. C. Kaushik, L. V. Kulkarni, A. Shyam, M. Srinivasan, Experimental investigations on neutron emission from projectile-impacted deuterated solids. Physics Lett. A 232, 384 (1997).

    20. I. P. Chernov, T. N. Mel'nikova, Y. P. Cherdantsev, M. Kreining, K. Baumbakh, Yield of nuclear reaction products from deuterium-saturated composite materials and layered structures. Russ. Phys. J 41, 642 (1998).

    21. S.-S. Jiang, X.-M. Xu, L.-Q. Zhu, S.-G. Gu, X.-C. Ruan, M. He, B.-J. Qi, Anomalous Neutron Burst Emissions in Deuterium-Loaded Metals: Nuclear Reaction at Normal Temperature. Chin, Phys.Lett. 29, 112501 (2012).

    22. M. Prelas, E. Lukosi, Neutron Emission from Cryogenically Cooled Metals Under Thermal Shock, in ICCF-18, Ed, Columbia, Mo, 2013).

    23. H. O. Menlove, High-sensitivity measurements of neutron emission from Ti metal in pressurized D2 gas, in The First Annual Conference on Cold Fusion, Ed: F. G. Will, (National Cold Fusion Institute, University of Utah Research Park, Salt Lake City, Utah, 1990), 250.

    24. H. O. Menlove, M. M. Fowler, E. Garcia, A. Mayer, M. C. Miller, R. R. Ryan, S. E. Jones, The measurement of neutron emission from Ti plus D2 gas. J. Fusion Energy 9, 215 (1990).

    25. H. O. Menlove, M. M. Fowler, E. Garcia, M. C. Miller, M. A. Paciotti, R. R. Ryan, S. E. Jones, Measurement of neutron emission from Ti and Pd in pressurized D2 gas and D2O electrolysis cells. J. Fusion Energy 9, 495 (1990).

    26. H. O. Menlove, M. C. Miller, Neutron-burst detectors for cold-fusion experiments. Nucl. Instr. Methods Phys. Res. A 299, 10 (1990).

    27. H. O. Menlove, M. A. Paciotti, T. N. Claytor, H. R. Maltrud, O. M. Rivera, D. G. Tuggle, S. E. Jones, Reproducible neutron emission measurements from Ti metal in pressurized D2 gas, in Anomalous Nuclear Effects in Deuterium/Solid Systems, "AIP Conference Proceedings 228", Ed: S. Jones, F. Scaramuzzi, D. Worledge, (American Institute of Physics, New York, Brigham Young Univ., Provo, UT, 1990), vol. 1, 287.

    28. H. O. Menlove, M. M. Fowler, E. Garcia, A. Mayer, M. C. Miller, R. R. Ryan, Measurement of neutron emission from cylinders containing titanium with pressurized deuterium gas, Presented at the Workshop on Cold Fusion Phenomena, Santa Fe, NM,, 1989.

    29. H. O. Menlove, M. A. Paciotti, T. N. Claytor, D. G. Tuggle, Low-background measurements of neutron emission from Ti metal in pressurized deuterium gas, in Second Annual Conference on Cold Fusion, "The Science of Cold Fusion", Ed: T. Bressani, E. Del Giudice, G. Preparata, (Societa Italiana di Fisica, Bologna, Italy, Como, Italy, 1991), 385.

    30. G. Mengoli, M. Fabrizio, C. Manduchi, G. Zannoni, L. Riccardi, A. Buffa, Tritium and neutron emission in D2O electrolysis at Pd and Ti cathodes. J. Electroanal. Chem. 322, 107 (1992).

  • Yes, there are many reports. So how the heck people can say LENR is not working? Why scientists are not investigating it? 30 years are over and people still thinks it is wishful thinking...

    I can't imagine how an experiment could be easier than mine. Work for 10 minutes.


    It would require just more investigation and it can change a lot. Still I don't know anything about energy yield.

  • Apparently this result using Ti is well known with many publications. Ed storms came up with these.

    ...
    25. H. O. Menlove, M. M. Fowler, E. Garcia, M. C. Miller, M. A. Paciotti, R. R. Ryan, S. E. Jones, Measurement of neutron emission from Ti and Pd in pressurized D2 gas and D2O electrolysis cells. J. Fusion Energy 9, 495 (1990).

    Here is a description of the electrolysis experiments from this Menlove paper:


    In addition to the gas phase experiments, we have run four experiments using Jones-type(3~ cells and electrolytes. Each of the experiments had six D20 cells located in System 1. The anodes were gold foils and the cathodes were Ti, Pd, V, and Zr (foils, crystals, sponge, and sintered powder).

    For one experiment, the electrolyte was D20 mixed with the multiple ingredients described in Ref. 3. For the other three experiments, the electrolyte was an acidified (pH = 4) 10-g/L Li2SO4/DaO solution. The currents and voltages were varied over the range from 0-4 A and 0-16V, respectively. Sometimes the voltage was pulsed (700 ms on, 100 ms off). The data were collected in 1000-s or 2000-s time bins, and the experiments lasted for several

    days to a week. The controls were six D20 cells of the same size and mass as the sample runs but without electrodes or six identical operating cells with H20 replacing DzO. The detectors gave the same background rate for the

    dummy sample and an empty sample cavity

    And the electrolysis results:


    We performed three experiments with Jonestype(3)cells where each experiment involved six D20 cells containing different cathodes of Ti, Pd, Zr, and V metal. While two experiments showed -3[sigma] results above background levels, the limited sensitivity in the random-counting mode precludes any definitive statement concerning neutron emission at this time. A fourth experiment gave burst yields after running the current for about 12 h of electrolysis, and the bursts

    continued for several days as shown in Fig. 3c.

  • Apparently this result using Ti is well known with many publications. Ed Storms came up with these.


    1. B. V. Derjaguin, A. G. Lipson, V. A. Kluev, D. M. Sakov, Y. P. Toporov, Titanium fracture yields neutrons? Nature (London) 341, 492 (issue 6242, 6212. Oct, Scientific Corresp. (1989).

    2. A. G. Lipson, V. A. Klyuev, B. V. Deryagin, Y. P. Toporov, D. M. Sakov, Anomalous beta activity of products of mechanical working of a titanium- deuterated material. Sov. Tech. Phys. Lett. 15, 783 (1989).

    Ed comes up with all these references at the touch of a button because he has the EndNote program with the database of papers, including remarks and abstracts. That's what I use for LENR-CANR.org. The search functions are not as good when I send the database to the on-line MySQL or this ascii file:


    http://lenr-canr.org/DetailOnly.htm


    Also, I do not include the abstracts and keywords when the paper is not on file.


    It is a shame EndNote does not have a version I can host on the website. I suggested to them they should do this. It would save me the steps of converting and uploading it when I make changes.


    Some of the papers Ed references are not in my copy of the database.

  • Sergey A. Tsvetkov has been working on deuterated titanium since 1989


    Research Article J. Condensed Matter Nucl. Sci. 8 (2012) 23–28


    Initiation of the Cold Fusion Reactions by Air Component

    EU Patent 2013


    400KW 10kg unit posited via

    https://deneum.com/


    Estonia runs on oilshale which is offensive to EU noses


    Lab demonstration promised this month..next four weeks.........maybe they can somewhat verify their white paper

  • And Spectrum from NaI. I think there is nothing interesting.


    JohnyFive, the spectrum may be important. Can you please give some details of the spectrometer you used, and whether the horizontal scale is calibrated for energy, or just for the channel number. Thanks!

  • Ni-H works to produce significant excess heat. I think that the central mechanism is related to the formation of spheromaks via one of many possible methods. In this setup, there are many different possible optimizations to explore. For example, I wonder how difficult it would be for someone without an ordinary lab to try and grow carbon, diamond like carbon, or diamond protrusions on the metal cathode. This may help the cathode emit a greater quantity of spheromaks. Or, if we want to try and form spheromaks in the interior of the cathode material, I wonder if a cryogenic quench to very low temperatures (or cycles of such treatments) could alter the sub-surface structure. I really do think that ordinary hydrogen without deuterium would work as well.

  • Here I have Ludlum 44-103 3x3" detector with small mod. Unfortunately I have no calibration source here at the moment. But it is not hard to identify peaks.


    I am still very curious how it is possible that the paper or other foams can be activated but radiation level is going down after several minutes with very same characteristics, independent from the material. This mean that the material is very likely not activated actually but is carrying something radioactive.

    Just putting highly activated paper at the detector and leaving everything alone without absolutely any change results in decreased radiation level over time. So that the only variable is time.

    It is absolutely perfectly verified so now I have zero doubt it is some coincidence or measurement error.


    Perfectly reproducible effect with no effort.


    Now I will try the same thing with H2O.


    Another thing would be to replicate the effect with a dry cell. But what could actually replace electrolysis? It is clear that the cathode is likely fully loaded with deuterium but the reaction is happening near the surface. How to push deuterium further to the "cathode" in a dry cell to achieve same condition? I mean with electrolysis you can do so without any interruption.

    Ideas?


    Maybe passing high voltage between anode/cathode could work?

  • I don't understand how it could be a radon flea.

    I can make a things radioactive on demand. Especially porous.

    If such things are anywhere else than above the cell they are not radioactive.

    It is that simple.


    The same thing can be radioactive and after decay it is not radioactive anymore. Then I can expose it again and it has elevated radiation again.

    During many years I am working here there was no elevated radiation anywhere in the lab.

  • Hi @JohnyFive, it very interesting looking at your alternative approach. Especially given its apparent simplicity.


    would you be able to make couple of calibration checks with your spectrometer?


    There could potentially be some interesting structure in that spectrum.


    I suppose the peaks towards the right side of the curve are a K40 peak? It’s interesting the multi peak structure to it though. And some other hints of structure further into the broader spectrum.


    Does anyone know if this structure at that end looks normal?


    1) It would be interesting to see the spectrum calibrated with a K40 source or something.... I wonder if sea salt or bananas would be sufficient;) (a second kind of radiation source might be good too)


    2) would it be possible to have a background spectrum from inside you lab as well?


    2a) It could be interestingly to have one with out any apparatus and another with dummy not active euipment with the same fuel ingredients if possible.


    3) If 2 and 2a are possible could you make a difference plot between the active run data and these? And maybe post the data as a table? There are some smart people like Can here who can make really interesting analysis of that kind of data.


    The difference plots could be intersting if peaks are seen but even an elevated over all broad spectrum can be interesting... even if in fact it follows the profile of background radiation but at higher level.


    4) A typical background spectrum also has a broad component and some peaks due to Radon fleas and K40. (I suspect Alan mentioned it because of this). So it could be interesting to check against the background:


    4a) if new peaks are seen of course this is fundamentally interesting


    4b) even if Some typical background peaks are elevated relative to the normal background it may give some insights... (what would cause that concentration)


    4c) if the broad part of the spectrum is relatively elevated it might indicate something possibly a Bremsstrahlung like phenomenon... we may even be able to see the Q value... which may point to a source and (possibley indicate both the energy generated and liberated in the source and the energy range of the stimulating radiation it generates)


    4d) if the whole background spectrum is amplified then that is most curious of all what on earth could amplify a whole spectrum?


    Regarding your possible future experiments with Hydrogen... maybe if it doesn’t work it could be interesting to add a twist by adding a bit of lithium. Although I think it may require an element of high keV stimulation. (Perhaps some deuteron would still be needed)



    Good luck with your future testing

  • 1) Energies are shifted by approximately 150keV at the K40 peak. Banana is very, very weak source.
    2) I am afraid but it is not possible to distinguish between background anymore. The room could be contaminated in some way as the experiments are running for longer time here. This is my fault because it should be taken prior the experiments. But there were other experiments running so there is nothing certain in that matter.

    2a) The measurement with NaI is little bit complicated. I have to start the experiment situated in a different position. Ideally shielded by Pb blocks. Until now I was focused on replication.

    4a) I am afraid but I am little bit skeptical regarding NaI in that case. It is super sensitive for gammas, but pretty blind for everything else. And in this case it is clearly a different kind of radiation. I found there is no count difference when measuring the radioactive paper. While even for very weak sources I can see count change immediately.

    I think that some super sensitive beta scintillator would be good way to go.


    All these experiments have LiOD as electrolyte. While in case of H2O it will be LiOH.

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