MIZUNO REPLICATION AND MATERIALS ONLY

  • There was some delay in my replication but finally I am preparing mesh for the reactor.


    I am just curious how Prof. Mizuno found the steps.


    Why he recommend to use Tap water instead of Demineralized water? In my opinion this contradict aim of making it very pure and repeatable.

    If you will leave it under water for a longer time there might be much more contamination and vice versa.


    Why to soak the mesh in 90°C water? And why for 1 hour? Why anyone would want to add H2O to the mesh since in next steps replicator is trying to get impurities out? What if this actually is increasing possibility for a failure due to unknown contamination?

    Why he think washing in tap water is necessary for replication?

    Doing something without knowing why can cause a lot of troubles. I am just curious if I can get answers for this.


    I believe he found the steps in some way and understand why it is needed.


    I dont know how Prof. Mizuno is busy but it seems to me he is giving only very small priority for this work as his tests are taking so long time. If he need money it shouldnt be a problem to fund him I guess.

  • I believe he found the steps in some way and understand why it is needed.


    It's called 'process knowledge' - the things that experimenters (and great cooks) learn during the course of performing hundreds of experiments. Half of it may be unnecessary, something akin to superstitious rituals, like wearing lucky socks to job interviews but the problem is you can never be sure which half is required and which half is not.

  • It's my friend JV who made this, he followed exactly team Rothwell/Mizuno's expectations.

    However, i suggest rather to use both 3 ways deposition , hand, plating, sputtering to compare process efficiency.

    At ICCF we saw another work also interesting concerning this way Pd/Ni but plated for example.

    My older friend Didier Grass melted zirconium oxide only by electrolysis this is why i prefer sputtering way he used successfully.

  • Lightning-Rod Effect of Plasmonic Field Enhancement on Hydrogen-Absorbing Transition Metals


    Norihiko Fukuoka and Katsuaki Tanabe

    Received: 1 August 2019; Accepted: 27 August 2019; Published: 30 August 2019



    The large field-enhancement effect on the hydrogen-absorbing transition metals, Pd, Ni, and Ti,

    observed in the series of calculations in this study can be used for various hydrogen-energy applications.

    As discussed in Reference [26], potential applications include hydrogen storage, sensing [48,49], laser

    fusion [46], and condensed-matter fusion. In addition, for the reported experiments so far, for instance,

    in the condensed-matter nuclear fusion field, it is highly possible that the deuterium-absorbed Pd,Ni, and

    Ti surfaces contained certain degrees of nano- or micro-scale native random roughnesses [39,40,50,51]

    corresponding to such morphological aspect ratios as those studied in this article. Therefore, some of the

    experimental material systems may have unknowingly benefited from the plasmonic field enhancement

    effect.

    https://res.mdpi.com/d_attachm…anomaterials-09-01235.pdf


  • Just a remark about the calcite: tap water varies enormously in its mineral content - minimum effort best guess at replicating process (given no-one can know what as aspect of the Mizuno methodology generated the R20 results, copying faithfully everything published is good idea) would be to measure or look up local tap water calcium content and match to the average of that in Mizuno's lab by dilution with distilled H20, or addition of carbonate heavy bottled water, if that is needed.


    Better effort (though not sure I'd bother) would be to prepare suitable water with known amount of carbonates and other minerals. In addition, if we are to view these calcite crystals as important it is possible that crystal size (surely relevant) could depend on drying procedure - temperature, etc. I'm not an expert on the morphology of crystal formation.


    These experimental issues show the peril of experimental replication of an intermittent effect where there is no theory to guide expectations. In principle any variable in the experiment can be the thing that switches things on or off. In non-LENR areas this type of investigation is normally solved by additional instrumentation and (eventually) discovering what is the mechanism, after which all becomes easy. Until that happens any anomaly can be the the result of an unrecorded experimental error, rather than an extraordinary evidence of new physics. I'd point out that it cuts both ways. Because results from undetected experimental errors are so easily fitted into an "LENR" hypotheses, given the properties of LENR are ill-defined, even if LENR exosts we should expect a lot of the claimed results to be error.


    If you think there are seldom undetected experimental errors you are probably unfamiliar with engineering! In all non-LENR fields they don't make headlines because the anomalous results are taken as sign of error, and the error is discovered.


    THH

  • I think a less patronising way of cautioning somebody who is a very skilled engineer might be appropriate.


    Perhaps I was using the wrong pronoun - I was not referring to magicsound - whose expertise you will remember I have never questioned (though for some reason people here continually seem to think I'm doing this) but the people who do not question experimental results, preferring to posit new physics as explanations for non-replicable anomalies. Magicsound does question experimental results - so would not be in that category.


    The conditional in the post means it was a sort of "cap fits wear it" comment.

  • Just a remark about the calcite: tap water varies enormously in its mineral content - minimum effort best guess at replicating process (given no-one can know what as aspect of the Mizuno methodology generated the R20 results, copying faithfully everything published is good idea) would be to measure or look up local tap water calcium content and match to the average of that in Mizuno's lab by dilution with distilled H20, or addition of carbonate heavy bottled water, if that is needed.

    THHuxleynew If you have not read my complete paper, please follow the references I included at the end. Analyses of tap water for my lab and for Sapporo municipal water show similar concentrations of Calcium. Of course, we cannot be sure if Mizuno's "tap water" is from the municipal supply, but that seems a reasonable assumption.


    Note also my included reference showing the characteristic morphology of precipitated Calcite crystals. However, from my investigation I believe that the crystal size is not very relevant, since they are ground up and intercalated with the Pd deposited by rubbing.

  • THHuxleynew If you have not read my complete paper, please follow the references I included at the end. Analyses of tap water for my lab and for Sapporo municipal water show similar concentrations of Calcium. Of course, we cannot be sure if Mizuno's "tap water" is from the municipal supply, but that seems a reasonable assumption.


    Note also my included reference showing the characteristic morphology of precipitated Calcite crystals. However, from my investigation I believe that the crystal size is not very relevant, since they are ground up and intercalated with the Pd deposited by rubbing.


    I did read the paper - and my comment re calcium content remains valid? I was not addressing this to you.


    THH


  • Is the plan to use your analyzed meshes in an actual replication of Mizuno R20 test? As a side comment, it's a bit strange to me that Mizuno/Rothwell strongly recommend accurate analytical procedure for gas evacuation and don't similarly suggest rigorous analysis of the prepared meshes as well (at least it's not part of the original paper).