Simon Brink "Subtle Atomics" Discussion Thread

  • If anyone is in communication with Simon Brink, please ask him to participate in this thread.


    I have a load of questions I'd like to ask.


    In response:


    1) Is platinum a catalyst according to his theory and where should it be on his chart? Yes, it does appear as an excellent catalyst (~0.14% match) for an n=1 to n=1/14 (sub-primary) transition. Note that the proposed size of n=1/14 would be around 6fm.


    2) What does he think is the lifetime of the different states of shrunken hydrogen before they go back to the ground state? If you go by the spacetime to mass conversion rate, it could take a very long time, but more likely shrunken H can absorb other locally available energy. As such return to ground state may be very dependent on local conditions (i.e. temperature, ppm, density, EM radiation, etc.).


    3) What does he think is required to make a "small hydrogen" atom undergo a nuclear reaction with another atom? For example, is there a special type of stimulation required that is different than what is required to produce the "small hydrogen" atom? Depends on which small hydrogen you have.


    4) Does he agree with Mills that an arc discharge accelerates the reaction rate due to the elimination of the space charge problem? Not sure what the Mills explanation is. My view is that it's more about creating flow conditions that produce a high pressure stationary electron zone which can cause electron shrinkage in the presence of a suitable catalyst.


    5) Does he think shrunken electrons could be repeatedly pumped to extract energy from the aether? The atomic reserve cycle. Why not!!! The problem is that you are going to end up with all these annoying LENR reactions!!!


    6) During any of his experiments, has he observed "strange radiation" track marks? Photographic reaction morphologies are highly variable and very interesting, particularly around secondary and tertiary reactions, and also halo effects around certain reactions. Secondary reactions are indicative of particles rather than strange radiation. Halos and shock waves may be more relevant to "strange radiation", but data is inadequate to come to any conclusions. There are quite a few photos on the website to explore.


    7) What is his plans to take his research to the next level? Research will mostly like continue on an as-time-permits basis, generally in the public domain, until such time as there is interest from a serious investor in IP ownership and a rapid progression towards commercial products and services.

  • My view is that it's more about creating flow conditions that produce a high pressure stationary electron zone which can cause electron shrinkage in the presence of a suitable catalyst.


    Interesting view. In the excerpt from your ICCF-21 presentation I transcribed a while back in this thread you mentioned that a sort of electrical "water hammer" effect could be involved in the electron shrinkage.


    Incidentally, the electrical equivalent of a water hammer is often considered to be a circuit with inductance. There, if current flow is suddenly changed, a counter EMF is produced. The larger the current and the more abrupt the change (and the higher the inductance), the more intense the "hammer effect", akin to what happens when trying to suddenly stop a large volume of high flowing water.


    Perhaps one could see similar results to using a large capacitor bank by abruptly interrupting a large current flow from a suitable coil or transformer?