ICCF23 open discussion

  • Too bad he didn't try more daring alloys than simple Palladium

    Is it sure he is not trying ?

    Parameter space have to be explored, and it would be logical it is currently.

  • I'm done for the evening now! Was up early to catch Hagelstein, and I'm beat now. Just watching and absorbing what I can.

    Hello to you. I'm wearing your T-shirt that you gave me, and I'll be seen or not, okay.

    Нефть - это кровь планеты, надо сделать модель планеты и мы получим генератор Тарасенко, эта энергия покорит вселенную! :lenr:

  • Last night I joined the zoom for a few minutes just in time to catch the questions to Steven Jones, and the Brazilian researcher Luciano Ondir asked him about the Nickel Hydrogen results (I guess because Jones did not talk much about them in his presentation) and at some point asked Jones if he knew about Rossi. I couldn’t stop laughing for a while, I wouldn’t have expected this kind of question brought up. Jones attempted to answer politely anyway.

    I certainly Hope to see LENR helping humans to blossom, and I'm here to help it happen.

  • Storms tried things that I have already mentioned including in my recent "essay" here.

    The need to strongly compress the powder with a press, therefore, and not with archaic screws and nuts like in France or Belgium.

    It has reached 50% porosity because at one point the compression ratio no longer plays a role and to further reduce the porosity, nanometric particles are needed. Thus it will be able to reach only 5% of porosity, quite sufficient to pass a gas. On the other hand, he will be able to increase his XSH by a factor of 10 !

    Too bad he didn't try more daring alloys than simple Palladium, 1989 is still stuck in the minds of the oldguard 8o

    I have to say that I saw right away the relationship of what Dr. Storms presented with your proposed approach, so Congratulations are in order Cydonia . Perhaps he is using Pd as Ni is considered too toxic, but I think this could drive to impressive results as those of Piantelli, who invested considerable effort in producing a very fine Ni nanopowder.

    I certainly Hope to see LENR helping humans to blossom, and I'm here to help it happen.

  • I am impressed Ruby! Keep on going girl. Been watching myself. I wonder if this virtual is not the way to go from now on.

    Carl Page said in the video played at the meeting that next summer ICCF24 will be in "Silicon Valley and the world", "the world" part meaning that they will broadcast live in a similar fashion, I interpret.


    ICCF23 was the first all virtual conference in the ICCF series, and Xiamen U did a fantastic presentation, having the videos stand in for the live presentation is brilliant. Most participants followed the rules so everything went smoothly. To see the live science presented right on my screen in my own home was excellent. Globally, the time change is always challenging, and I didn't see the whole thing, but the videos are available http://ikkem.com/iccf-23_oralab.php and there is a lot of research to try and understand there.


    I feel like the CMNS field has made a shift up to a new level of understanding on the hard science results and academic and industry attention. More labs getting Mizuno's 40 Watts is the first step to getting Mizuno's kilowatts. What Fran Tanzella shows about materials in active systems shows that Brillouin understands a lot about the materials (since he works with them on testing). Storms' new discovery of making active material -every time active - by pressing the Pd powder (and heating, cooling, etc) is evidence of another bump up. How many labs will start pressing powder now? I hope a lot, and more attention means we are set for another bump up.


    I want to believe the next shift is going to bring real and meaningful breakthrough for the science, and engineering. Good things are happening. It's got to be sooner than later though, this planet is on fire.

  • Thank you Curbina for your understanding.. I'm involved deeply inside the field since 15 years ago now.

    I have studied several thousand papers, I have done a lot of cross-checking and I have also followed storms since my first readings.

    Moreover, Storms also has a lot of merit because it does not only have admirers in the field including bad judgment from eminent members of the Clean HME project, for example.

    The road is often hard and you get bitter at times, I wish someone could help me to convince him to try some of my ideas, that would be good but...like all of us, he tends to follow his own. path too..



    I have to say that I saw right away the relationship of what Dr. Storms presented with your proposed approach, so Congratulations are in order Cydonia . Perhaps he is using Pd as Ni is considered too toxic, but I think this could drive to impressive results as those of Piantelli, who invested considerable effort in producing a very fine Ni nanopowder.

  • Carl Page said in the video played at the meeting that next summer ICCF24 will be in "Silicon Valley and the world", "the world" part meaning that they will broadcast live in a similar fashion, I interpret.

    They said future conferences will be "hybrid," meaning some people will attend in person, while others attend via Zoom.


    I expect Zoom will improve. It is awkward in some ways. It is okay for casual use, but I think it could be improved for large meetings.


    The participants did behave. Some seemed to have trouble with computers. I guess because they are . . . um . . . old. They had trouble turning on their mics or sharing their screens. They displayed powerpoint slides in the edit mode instead of full screen. One of them irked me by playing back a lecture with terrible audio quality. Terribly noisy static. He should have checked the quality of the video, found it was bad, and he should have done it over from the start. It is rude to subject your audience to that. You sometimes have problems during a live presentation, but there is no reason why you should with a recorded presentation. Just spend another 20 minutes doing it over. For my presentation in India this year, I recorded it 3 or 4 times to get it right.


    Another thing I cannot understand is why people present a recorded video presentation that runs overtime. That is sloppy. If they say 20 minutes, do it in 20 minutes. If it comes out 25 minutes, cut out some text or eliminate a few slides and do it again.


    More labs getting Mizuno's 40 Watts is the first step to getting Mizuno's kilowatts.

    Amen.


    But I would rather see people get 40 W reliably than kilowatts once in a blue moon and nothing most of the time.

  • For my presentation in India this year, I recorded it 3 or 4 times to get it right.

    I used the PowerPoint feature that lets you add a voice-over to the slides. Let me warn readers here: that feature is tricky. You need to practice using it a few times. Make a recording, play it back, and then do it again. The trickiest part is that the audio track breaks with each slide. If you press "next slide" while you are talking, your voice will be cut off abruptly, to pick up a second later. It works that way because the voice track follows the slides around when you rearrange them. If you have slides 1, 2, 3 and you make that 1, 3, 2, the audio for #3 will follow to become #2. That's good. But you have to watch out that your voice-over does not get things in the wrong order.


    If you are going to do this, for goodness sake use a good microphone in a quiet environment. Barking dogs and flushing toilets should be eliminated.

  • Another thing I cannot understand is why people present a recorded video presentation that runs overtime. That is sloppy. If they say 20 minutes, do it in 20 minutes. If it comes out 25 minutes, cut out some text or eliminate a few slides and do it again.

    Jed's criticism is valid. That said, I personally found N.Lynn Bowen's talk on nuclear structure one of the most clearly presented and interesting of the entire conference. She did take over 20 minutes, and was interrupted several times by the chair toward the end. It clearly threw her off pace and caused some discomfort. I think a bit more flexibility in such rules would be helpful, though perhaps difficult to apply impartially.

  • That said, I personally found N.Lynn Bowen's talk on nuclear structure one of the most clearly presented and interesting of the entire conference.

    Yes, that was very good. She did another presentation years ago about magic numbers and how they don't exist. It was interesting. I keep meaning to ask her for a paper. Not cold fusion, but I would like to read it carefully.


    She did take over 20 minutes, and was interrupted several times by the chair toward the end.

    Was it significantly longer than 20 minutes? I did not notice. With a live presentation, I would let the speaker go 5 minutes extra. I was saying that a video presentation should be right on time because you can record it again. You probably should record it again. Practice makes perfect.

  • This was the first time I’ve attended / watched the conference in real time and it was a real pleasure. My thanks and congratulations to all involved in organising it, and to those who presented. Quite aside from the presentations I caught, it was also fun to just sit and listen to the informal chat. I wish I’d realised earlier that all these side conversations were going on outside of the formal presentations. I look forward to ICCF24!

  • Storms tried things that I have already mentioned including in my recent "essay" here.

    The need to strongly compress the powder with a press, therefore, and not with archaic screws and nuts like in France or Belgium.

    It has reached 50% porosity because at one point the compression ratio no longer plays a role and to further reduce the porosity, nanometric particles are needed. Thus it will be able to reach only 5% of porosity, quite sufficient to pass a gas. On the other hand, he will be able to increase his XSH by a factor of 10 !

    Too bad he didn't try more daring alloys than simple Palladium, 1989 is still stuck in the minds of the oldguard 8o

    Storms had used many alloys early on, as did many people working in the early days. Like Storms literally tried dozens of different combinations of metals. However they mostly would make solid pieces, or thin-films. Back then, ithey did not use pressed powder alloys. It seems in hindsight, yeah, why not pressed powders? I guess it just takes 32 years to think of some things.

  • JedRothwell once again gave me a good laugh with his remark about formers and their computer problems. How many times have I seen my friend Jean Luc paillet suffer with his Mac .. at the same time, he is a mathematician with a logic of linear thought whereas the essence of computer science is rather the tree structure.


    About Silicon valley, Mountain view is all the same the center of the world in my eyes. Without wanting to flatter, I am jealous, there must surely be more things happening there than in a small country like Belgium for example.


    rubycarat about Storms I started the LENR by reading his files, advantage was that he explains things well especially for a beginner. Knowing the matter science well, I quickly got hooked. Then, I had to look a little further because to say that everything happens in a crack a NAE does not explain how it works in it ...

    It's not only a matter of materials choice.


    the first thing to determine are the reagents combination, so if one wants to make D + D a PD lattice will be fine.

    But if we want to use H instead, this one will be able to react with the lattice material, this is more interesting, we will have for example H + Ni or H + Cu or H + Ti etc (in the latter case beware of neutrons).

    This way is much simpler and more commercially promising than deuterium i expect.

    Then, you need a large reaction surface between all the Ni and all the H. So the powder allowing a supply from outside will be much more efficient than the diffusion as Iwamura uses for example. This is why we need a kind of catalyst at this stage to well rather enough supply H up to Nickel atoms.Then, it is necessary to take care about quality contact between nickel and hydrogen. Either make an assembly which corresponds to what I call a kind of short circuit, which is recommended by Kodama or at the time Kervran, or make load fluctuations with an excited H and a heated lattice subjected to phonons (shortcut).

    Here is :thumbup:


    Storms had used many alloys early on, as did many people working in the early days. Like Storms literally tried dozens of different combinations of metals. However they mostly would make solid pieces, or thin-films. Back then, ithey did not use pressed powder alloys. It seems in hindsight, yeah, why not pressed powders? I guess it just takes 32 years to think of some things.