Does LENR produce harmful radiations?

  • - one of the observations is that there were no track on DVDs wrapped in the aluminum foil.


    They should have checked the aluminum foil of course!..


    Or may be our explanation of positroniums being a part of the story would also explain this behavior.

  • I would worry more about 'thermal waves', if real, as reported by Kornilova as they seem to be highly penetrating

    Thanks for that Max - actually I think the 'thermal waves' are actually magnetic - inductive coupling at a distance. Maybe?


    About this effect being magnetic - I have my doubts. The propagation characteristics and effects of magnetic fields (particularly when the distance from the source is much larger than the size of the source) are pretty well known.


    Now, different people have tried to explain some (possibly assumed) properties with models of entirely different types:

    1. Corpuscular (with models sometimes requiring either very large objects or extreme energy levels in order to explain the effects)

    2. Unconventional electromagnetic (often with problematic models that violate conservation of charge or other well known basics)

    3. Thermal wave / VHF ultrasound with shockwave-like propagation characteristics (as postulated by Dr. Kornilova)


    Since the exact nature of these waves is not well understood, it would make sense to double-check some properties experimentally.


    Here are some ideas on how at least some of these large classes can be differentiated from each other:


    To distinguish 3. (specifically) from 1. or 2.: Ultrasound and thermal waves require a material, therefore cannot propagate in vacuum. A dewar connected to a vacuum pump and a gas inlet (to selectively evacuate the space between source and detector without changing the construction and geometry of the overall experiment) would make the propagation vs. non-propagation of an unknown radiation type in vacuum relatively easy to test. Note however that shockwave like phenomena can refract and reflect off surfaces (and even material density gradients), to there may still be some propagation paths elsewhere around an evacuated dewar.


    To distinguish 1. from anything else: Use shields of a dense material (like lead). Large corpuscular objects do not pass through dense material, so a comparison of penetration through a light vs. a dense material should provide an indication of whether there are large corpuscular particles involved. If the unknown radiation passes through lead and through low density plastic with a similar penetration ability, it is unlikely to consist of large matter particles. The difference in mass ratio between an unknown large particle and a lead atom vs. the same particle and a carbon atom would make for distinguishable propagation characteristics.


    To distinguish charged vs. neutral particles: A cloud chamber with a magnet (or a pair of electrodes) will do just fine. A classic test, well known since a century.


    To distinguish an electromagnetic vs. a shockwave-like interaction of an unknown emission with materials in the environment: use many-layered shields with different types of layer structures.

    - An electromagnetic type interaction will be strongest with a multi-layer structure when the layers have different electrical (conductor vs. isolator) or magnetic (ferromagnetic vs. diamagnetic) properties even when the layers all share similar densities and similar sound and shockwave propagation characteristics.

    - A shockwave type interaction will be strongest with a multi-layer structure when the layers have different densities and therefore reflect shockwaves on internal surfaces, even when the layers all share similar electrical characteristics.

    - In addition, electromagnetic and shock waves can each be absorbed by dissipative materials and it's possible to make materials that are to one type much more dissipative than to the other. Loose layers of paper or thin films can be strongly dissipative to acoustic and shockwave type effects while not doing much at all against electromagnetism, while a dense structure of strongly bonded alternating layers of different conductivities or different characteristic impedances will have effects on anything charged or electromagnetic, while it may pass sound and shock waves as well as any similar homogenous solid material would pass them.




  • Hi Alan, during the last few month I have been working together with other individuals. We have also been investigating theories on how to deal with SR. One idea was a technique of active cancelation of SR instead of passive shielding. At the moment it is a theory, but it would be interesting to get a second opinion. After confirming with my partner I could provide a concept paper.

  • You will create antistrange Radiation to annihilate it? That is the strangest idea of all.

    Yes, a sort of.... Please refer to following link:

    https://www.dropbox.com/s/c45r…ange%20Radiation.pdf?dl=0


    We have already derived a concrete concept on how to apply above idea on a Ni-Li lattice reactor type and are open for cooperation. Anybody interested may send me an Email or private message on LENR forum.

  • https://translate.google.com/t…6SHOWALL_1%3D1&edit-text=


    Features of the periodic discharge in the fluid flow and the specifics of its impact on the electrode material


    This strange radiation has been micro photographed and studied.


    Ris_5.jpg

  • Just a random thought on the subject. I find curious or "strange" that the existence of "strange" particles (i.e. radiation) is already acknowledged in mainstream science. Incidentally, in one theory related with LENR observations (which I won't mention here but you can easily guess what it is) the reaction does initially emit "strange" neutral particles. Given that certain neutral particles are known to oscillate in space and time with their antiparticles, I'm wondering if this could be in part responsible for the segmented tracks on witness solid materials as reported by some researchers (apparently mainly Russian).


    Was the choice of the term "strange" coincidental and originally just to refer to some unexplained phenomenon?

  • Have low energy neutrons been excluded as a source of this strange radiation? If they lack the atom-smashing, deep penetrating, tissue damaging radiological effects of their high energy counterparts might such a simple explanation have been overlooked?

  • Thanks Alan I've read some of Ken Shoulder's work before - but I don't think he specifically made any connection between his bizarre electron observations and cold fusion. The clustering of electrons to form EVO's or plasmoids he observed is very hard to either understand in physical terms or explain other than saying 'we know nothing' about the forces or energies behind it. I mean how do you confine 6.23 . 10power 23 electrons in a single cluster when each electron is fighting to find free space from its buddies via Coulombic repulsion? The same unknown force that also allows proton fusion in LENR? Means we all have a long way to go before we fully understand any of this - only scratching the surface so far.

  • Thanks Alan I've read some of Ken Shoulder's work before - but I don't think he specifically made any connection between his bizarre electron observations and cold fusion. The clustering of electrons to form EVO's or plasmoids he observed is very hard to either understand in physical terms or explain other than saying 'we know nothing' about the forces or energies behind it. I mean how do you confine 6.23 . 10power 23 electrons in a single cluster when each electron is fighting to find free space from its buddies via Coulombic repulsion? The same unknown force that also allows proton fusion in LENR? Means we all have a long way to go before we fully understand any of this - only scratching the surface so far.


    The cluster of electrons are converted to bosons via entanglement. The electron becomes a polariton. For more info see as follows:


  • The W and Z bosons are carrier particles that mediate the weak nuclear force, much as the photon is the carrier particle for the electromagnetic force. So how do electrons transform into bosons and then don't they have a very brief half-life and revert back to leptons (electrons)?

  • The cluster of electrons are converted to bosons via entanglement. The electron becomes a polariton. For more info see as follows:



    Axil - electrons bound to holes in a lattice together with photons (think of it loosely as electrons orbiting holes) can become polaritons. You don't get holes without a sea of bound valence electrons and hence a lattice. The density of polaritons is thus limited - in fact to less than the number of valence electrons because adjacent polaritons interfere with each other.


    However that mechanism pretty obviously does not allow an ultra-high density of electrons because that would require a lattice with a correspondingly high number of valence electrons.


    The same thing (finite density of holes) applies in quantum wells.


    TANSTAAFL


    PS - however I'ne reason to think EVOs have ultra-high electron density? As all plasmas the electron charge is balanced by ions and it works like a gas but where thermal energies are higher than valence binding energies.

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