Strong evidence for a new kind of radiation.

  • Remember: at the start of this fatal pandemic - how many years ago? - I was saying to you: maybe it is a bad flu, or maybe we are like Pliny the Elder in his library in Pompeii, gazing at the glowing gleams of the awaking Vesuvius, and wondering what omen from the Gods that could mean.


    It was a bad flu, fortunately. Well regarding the work of Alexander Parkhomov, maybe it is an experimental error, or maybe we are in front of the new Solvay meeting, those meetings where science falters on its foundations, to find a new balance.


    Error or revolution? It’s amazing to experience these exciting moments and discussions on this forum.

  • ... "we are like Pliny the Elder in his library in Pompeii" ...


    Wrong: not in Pompei, but in Miseno, the opposite side of gulf of Naples - Pliny the Elder was commander in chief of Thyrrenian fleet.


    "My uncle was stationed at Misenum, where he was in active command of the fleet, with full powers. On the 24th of August , about the seventh hour, my mother drew his attention to the fact that a cloud of unusual size and shape had made its appearance. He had been out in the sun, followed by a cold bath, and after a light meal he was lying down and reading. Yet he called for his sandals, and climbed up to a spot from which he could command a good view of the curious phenomenon. Those who were looking at the cloud from some distance could not make out from which mountain it was rising - it was afterwards discovered to have been Mount Vesuvius - but in likeness and form it more closely resembled a pine-tree than anything else, for what corresponded to the trunk was of great length and height, and then spread out into a number of branches, the reason being, I imagine, that while the vapour was fresh, the cloud was borne upwards, but when the vapour became wasted, it lost its motion, or even became dissipated by its own weight, and spread out laterally. At times it looked white, and at other times dirty and spotted, according to the quantity of earth and cinders that were shot up."


    Pliny the Younger


    Epistulae 16, VI - very interesting thing to read:


    http://www.attalus.org/old/pliny6.html#16

  • Well.... 100 W tungsten incandescent lamp installed and heating the calorimeter. I am using a Kill-A-Watt for monitoring the lamp input power, rather than reconfigure the data logger for AC. With unmodified direct outlet supply, it should be plenty close enough. I can still fire up the regular heater at 200 W in addition to the lamp for comparison.

  • Peter

    I don't know where are other slides being posted; please upload them here.

    Though, if they come from Parkhomov, then people in contact with him could translate the original presentation directly and avoid a lot of duplicate/inefficient work.

  • Turns out they have been uploaded here by Bob Greenyer:


    https://e-catworld.com/2020/09…ation/#comment-5091604280

    https://drive.google.com/file/…mw7BdsyPLYby4XeqqgEz/view

    https://drive.google.com/file/…NDv0TM_f4ybivbQKqcvR/view


    Attached a fast translation with Google translate; it likely contains errors.

  • 200 W delta T hovering between 14.6 and 14.8 C. Might climb a tiny bit higher if I leave it for 2 or 3 more hours, but I think I get the point, so will turn on the tungsten lamp again, with the 200 W heater still going, for a total of 298.2 W, and I predict a delta T for that of 22 C...

  • Peter

    I translated it because I was curious to know more in detail the testing conditions behind these excess heat statements. It seems that the general idea is that it is the dense materials surrounding (and possibly in thermal contact with) the incandescent lamp that would start exhibiting excess heat. So, possibly just the lamp in an empty, thin-walled air-flow calorimeter might not show much or anything at all.


    I am not located in the UK.

  • Interestingly, the 100 W lamp uses about 1 less W with the heater also on. The current remains constant at 0.82 A.

    Anyways, 22 C delta T now happening. Will leave it for another hour, then will switch off the 200 W Kanthal heater, but will let the 97 W lamp run until that stabilizes again.

  • Makes sense. The extra heater raises the bulb temp and thus the filament R increases a bit

    I suspect two things in parallel.

    1) the voltage drops slightly due to the extra load of the heater.

    2) the calorimeter air temperature is higher, so the bulb runs that much hotter, which in turn increases the resistance of the filament.

  • Peter

    I translated it because I was curious to know more in detail the testing conditions behind these excess heat statements. It seems that the general idea is that it is the dense materials surrounding (and possibly in thermal contact with) the incandescent lamp that would start exhibiting excess heat. So, possibly just the lamp in an empty, thin-walled air-flow calorimeter might not show much or anything at all.


    I am not located in the UK.

    What I understand Is that incandescent metals emit something (Parkhomov proposed is a kind of neutrinos and anti neutrinos) that interacts with dense matter and causes transmutation and excess energy.


    If one accepts his setups are capable of measuring excess heat with enough accuracy, then he seems to have strong evidence for his claim. He backs up the calorimetry with which is IMHO compelling evidence of transmutation. I agree with Alan Smith that the gamma measures would have sealed the deal, but the experiments shown by Parkhomov are diverse and relatively simple enough to warrant replication from curious parties.

    I certainly Hope to see LENR helping humans to blossom, and I'm here to help it happen.

  • Curbina

    I wanted to focus more on the implication that the incandescent metal itself wouldn't show excess heat on its own but would need surrounding dense matter for the emitted particles to interact with. If these are neutral particles, low-atomic number elements would probably work best, but it might depend on the actual interaction details.